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It depends on what you mean by "idiom"*, but I don't know of any examples, and if such a language were known to exist, it would be a big deal. So I would guess that nobody has identified any such natural language. *Here's what I mean. Examples like "It's raining cats and dogs" are notably "flashy" or memorable idioms, since they paint a vivid (and in this ...


2

From the definition, the words have to belong together and form another meaning to be multi word expressions. But Uncle and John convey two completely separate meanings. One difference to an MWE is that Uncle John can be translated to any language which knows a word or a phrase meaning Uncle and a name close enough to John without any difficulties and in ...


2

This is very difficult. I'll recommend three things: Use the U of I CogComp shallow parser to get phrases (not CoreNLP), see: http://nlp.cogcomp.org/ It's much better at picking up phrases, IMO. If you google around, you'll find several pre-built list of phrases (idioms, fixed expressions, etc.); use the ones that meet your needs for example, https://...


1

I don't think that any concept of “idiom” could be considered a property of specific languages. Rather, idioms are ways how humans use language to express things, to explain things in a way that's not strictly literal. Idioms enrich the language, they make it interesting, they even allow individual people to express themselves in a unique, personal way. ...


1

I find the question and much of the discussion so far contaminated by confusions between language and writing and between word and phrase. "Frying pan" is a noun; it is a compound, made up of two words, "frying" and "pan", which are both nouns. It is not a noun phrase, though you might be able to find a noun phrase (e.g., the subject of a sentence) which ...


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