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8

The reason that Spanish linguists transcribed the phoneme /s/ in Nahuatl as z/c(i/e) rather than s is because at that time Spanish had two alveolar sibilant phonemes, an apical /s̺/ written s and a laminal /s̻/ written z/c(i/e), and that the dental or alveolar sibilant in the Nahuatl spoken at that time was acoustically closer to the laminal than apical /s/. ...


6

Nothing, probably. The verb nahua- means "to speak clearly/out loud", and I haven't seen any evidence for it being composed of multiple morphemes, or for *na- having a meaning of its own. (I've put in a request for Miller's Uto-Aztecan Cognate Sets at the library, which might give more conclusive proof, but it won't be in for a few days.)


6

Unsurprisingly, this issue has plagued OT since its inception a quarter century ago. One issue is defining exactly what "problem" is: my own view is that the relevant question should not involve reifying a phenomenon (opacity), it involves comparison of analytic devices (ordering versus...). The term "opacity" was introduced by Kiparsky in 1971, but has ...


4

The word was probably not an actual compound, rather it was a conventionalized collocation, similar to English "kick the bucket". Andrews in his Introduction to Classical Nahuatl indicates that the absolutive marker -tl is not used in the first member of a compound, so nene-tl + pil-li → nenepilli. Karttunen in her dictionary comments for the specific word ...


3

You were on the right track! However, the morphology is a little more tricky than just person, number, and tense. Classical Nahuatl verbs have the basic form: subject prefix + object prefix + verb stem + subject number Now this doesn't include tense nor mood which can be prefixes or suffixes which greatly complicates things, not to mention the multitude of ...


2

all stages of Spanish definitely had s for [s], it seems clear that the sound the first transcribers heard definitely wasn't [s]. This seems like an oversimplification. Fricatives developed in different ways in different Spanish dialects: some had seseo (both <s> and <c/z> merged as [s]) some had ceceo (both <s> and <c/z> merged as [θ]) and some ...


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