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Why does English not have a cognate of words like heter, in Swedish, or llama, in Spanish, etc?

English does have that verb which is etymologically related to the Swedish heter, Icelandic heiti, German heißen, etc. In English it is to hight, only it is archaic, still sometimes it is used ...
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25 votes
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In romance languages, are there examples of male names that derive from female names?

The first thing I thought of was names derived in antiquity from the names of ancient Greek goddesses. For example, the French male name Hercule is ultimately from the name of the Greek goddess Hera (...
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24 votes
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Why was the name תאומא transliterated as Θωμᾶς (Thomas) rather than Τωμᾶς (Tomas)?

It is because, at least in the later borrowings, Semitic ṭ ט is regularly represented by τ [t], while t ת is represented by θ [th]. It has to do with the fact that the Semitic emphatics are ...
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13 votes
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Why are Native American names translated?

The answer to the question about modern practice is 'convention'. In general awareness Native American names have the form of 'Epithet Object/Animal' such as 'Red Cloud' or 'Crazy Horse'. Therefore ...
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13 votes

Why does English not have a cognate of words like heter, in Swedish, or llama, in Spanish, etc?

From my understanding of the other answers, I think English does have this idiom. Only, instead of a "word", in English "nothing at all" is used (or if you're a programmer, the empty string). The ...
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13 votes

Is the study of proper names really a branch of linguistics?

Proper names are nouns, albeit with specific characteristics, so they play the roles other nouns play in syntax (subject, object, etc). They also partake in morphology; if a language has genders, it ...
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12 votes

In romance languages, are there examples of male names that derive from female names?

In Italian there are a number of historically female names which are occasionally used as male names, e.g. Celeste, Amabile, Fiore, Diamante In many Romance languages the female name Maria (or some ...
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10 votes

Why are Native American names translated?

I think, the names in the other languages like Greek or Arabic that have their meaning in those languages are standardized, for example 'Abdullah' meaning 'God's Servant' was and is given to millions ...
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9 votes

Why does English not have a cognate of words like heter, in Swedish, or llama, in Spanish, etc?

English does have a word for it, it's called. e.g. Swedish: Jag heter Danny English: I'm called Danny Although I'm Danny, or My name's Danny sounds less 'weird' to me.
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9 votes

Julius Caesar original name spelling?

As others stated, on monumental inscriptions, the name of Julius Caesar would look similar to IVLIVS CAESAR However, saying it was "spelled with an I instead of a J" may be misleading, because 'J' ...
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9 votes

Why is it that Babylonian king names do not match their Akkadian equivalent?

This comes down to the ambiguities in the Cuneiform script. Cuneiform doesn't have a one-to-one correspondence between signs and sounds. The sign DIŊIR is a good example. The sign started out in ...
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9 votes

Why are the phonemes of Tutankhamun's throne name transliterated out of order?

The throne name (praenomen) has the following four hieroglyphs, listed by Gardiner number as: 𓎟 V30 (basket) 𓏥 Z2 (three strokes) 𓆣 L1 (dung beetle) 𓇳 N5 (sun) I think the issue ...
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Excepting Romanian, is "Wales" ever translated/transliterated in modern languages with the same term as that meaning "Gaul" or "Gauls"?

This may sound weird, but it's not. Well, in fact, it is very weird indeed. –– With equal right one might say that Romania should correctly be called Wales. –– If that joke is lost on you, read the ...
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8 votes
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How do Indian short form of names work in the USA?

Long Indian names are indeed shortened for informal/semi formal usage in India too. It is typically shortened to the first two syllables. For example Venkataraghavan usually becomes Venkat and in the ...
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7 votes

Etymology of Agamemnon and Priam

The currently favoured theory (e.g. in Beekes, with references) is that *Ἀγαμέμνων, variants –μέσμων and –μέμμων, is from * Ἀγα-μέδ-μων, from μέδομαι “to be concerned with”, and not from μένω (which ...
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6 votes

Are there any languages or cultures that have genderless given names?

Just so you know, Camille is a gender-neutral name. It's French, and actually it's the most famous gender-neutral name in France. Nowadays, about 70% of Camille are females. However, during the 19th ...
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6 votes
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Do Azeri people actually use Ə instead of A in names?

This is an interesting question. As always with transliteration, there are compromises. Why do Azeris still transcribe their names if both the forms are written in Latin? I am aware that they used ...
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6 votes
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Why do some languages have many names?

The names for a given language can be divided into exonyms and endonyms. Exonyms are the names given to the language (sometimes by extension, from the name given to the people who speak it) by ...
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6 votes

Frequency of non-legal name preference

This is an area where meaningful scientific research is impossible. The main problem lies in the concept of "legal name". There are hundreds of countries with their own laws, which may range ...
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5 votes

Is the study of proper names really a branch of linguistics?

Onomastics¹ has a big overlap with linguistics, specially with historical linguistics (derivation and meaning of names, sound shifts, etc.). Some valuable historical linguistic information is only ...
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5 votes

In romance languages, are there examples of male names that derive from female names?

There are a few examples from Germanic names: Deolindo or Teolindo are derived from Deolinda/Teolinda (modern German cognate: Dietlind).
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5 votes

In romance languages, are there examples of male names that derive from female names?

Derivation and inflection are different processes. Several proper nouns in Romance languages inflect for gender; in French, such inflection may be easily mistaken for a derivation, because the ...
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5 votes
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Does the southern pronunciation of Jenny have a triphthong in it?

Phonetically, I would say no. Here's a plot of this final vowel (taken from about 12.75 seconds into the linked video). It's not a great plot, since the recording quality I'm using isn't great, but ...
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5 votes

Is Latin Proto-Romance?

"Proto-X" tends to be used for the last common ancestor of X—the point at which the X languages started to diverge and become their own entities. This is why you'll sometimes hear about "pre-Proto-...
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4 votes

Name of the Armenian people/language

“Armenian” is հայերեն for which the usual transliteration is hayeren. ր is a single-tap /r/, as opposed to the trilled ռ, transliterated as ṙ.
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What is the linguistics term for descriptive names?

There's nothing special about them, AFAIK. A huge number of personal names, everywhere, are like that. For example, George (earth-worker) , Alfred (Elf-council), etc. look just as descriptive. Most ...
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4 votes

Two questions about Sappho's name

If I may answer the second of your two interesting questions. As a rule, Aeolic, Doric and some other Greek dialects retain original /ā/ where Ionic and Attic have shifted it to η. This is a famous ...
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4 votes
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Addressing others using names/titles vs pronouns

The term is named "Pronoun Avoidance" and you can see which languages avoid using pronouns for politeness in this map: https://wals.info/feature/45A#2/25.7/137.0 Also see the explanation in ...
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