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No, I don't think so. It is plausible to assume that the Adriatic Veneti and the Vistula Veneti are connected or even the same people trading along the Amber Road connecting the Baltic sea with the Mediterranean Sea. The Gaulish Veneti can well be an offshot of that population migrating together with Celtic people westward during the Celtic expansion. ...


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Your question is too broad to be easily answered. Different regions of Europe began to use surnames at different times, often as a result of government policy. England, for example, began the process in the 1400s, whereas most Icelanders still use patronymics. The government of Prussia imposed a specified set of surnames on its Jewish inhabitants in the ...


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This question ties into a wider sociolinguistic discussion of the cultures, traditions and customs around naming in general. The balance between conventionalisation and uniqueness / identifiability in names is a sociological construct, a function of how names are perceived in a culture, whilst the transparency and "salience" of a name is a more purely ...


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These "titles" are called epithets as already brought up in comments. As for what this structure might be called grammatically, German employs a near identical structure which can be analyzed as an Adpositional Adjectival Noun. This is just a fancy way of saying that we have a noun-like adjective after the name: Friedrich der Große / Frederick the ...


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The grammatical construction in the examples is called apposition. Note that the definite article "the" is not a necessary part of an apposition, an example without article is Mary, Peter's sister,. In languages with case marking, the appositive often agrees in case with the head known, in German Friedrich der Große is declined as Friedrich der ...


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Even if you uppercase something you still need to support your claim with some proof, because otherwise one can come up with a refutation similar in it's nature, like this one: No, it DOES have something to do with Ashkenazi. See, it's not that convincing per se, so I'll provide some explanation. Jews have a long-documented history of adopting same name ...


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