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5

You may be misunderstanding what the IPA symbols describe. Nasals are by definition pulmonal sounds where the air is released through the nose, while being stopped by an occlusion in the mouth. [m, n, ɲ] are a series of these with variing position: for [m], the closure is created at the front, by closing both lips. For [n], it's a behind that, between the ...


0

Assuming that the data is correct and there's indeed good basis to say that /i, u/ don't become nasalised, then in the IPA vowel space what distinguishes these two vowels from all the rest is that they're high/close as opposed to mid or low/open. In generative / autosegmental phonology this is encoded as the vowel feature [+high]. In particle phonology, ...


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The difficulty in seeing the solution derives from the theory of classifying groups of sounds. You can see that [i u] do not become nasal, and [a e o] do, but how do you encode that in a rule. One (bad) solution is to simply list the three letters that do nasalize, and forego any generalization of what the one class of sounds have in common. So you need a ...


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