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Where the nasal-ness comes in

There is a terminological distinction made between “a nasal” like [m n ŋ], and “a nasalized sound” which has a tilde over it (ã,r̃). Your question seems to be more about nasalized sounds. A nasalized ...
user6726's user avatar
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5 votes
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Does Tibetan have nasalized consonants, or is the nasalness on the vowels?

I'm going to go out on a bit of a limb, and say that the reference to 'nasal and non-nasal consonant' is actually high and low tone respectively, as found in Standard Tibetan, both in Lhasa and in the ...
Michaelyus's user avatar
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5 votes
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What is the name of rear nasal t in 'written' or d in 'ridden'?

There are two terms for this. One is "syllabic nasal", as in [ɹɪdn̩] "ridden", also in some pronunciations [n̩nɔi] "annoy". The second is "nasal release", which ...
user6726's user avatar
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5 votes

Are nasals stop consonants?

It's all about the manner of articulation. A stop consonant is by definition a sound produced by the complete obstruction of airflow though the mouth, at least for a short time. There are two kinds, ...
No Name's user avatar
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4 votes
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What's the acoustic difference between laterals and nasals

This may be a useful overview, also this (ultimately, Johnson “Acoustic and Auditory Phonetics” chapter 9, not online). Nasals have anti-formants at 1100 Hz and 3300 Hz, laterals at 2100 Hz, and the ...
user6726's user avatar
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4 votes

Are nasals stop consonants?

The answer can be either yes or no—it comes down to your definition. Some people define "stop consonants" to be consonants where the airflow is completely stopped (as in, the opposite of continuant ...
Draconis's user avatar
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3 votes

The pronunciation of nasalized cardinal vowels

Officially, they don't exist. You might try to produce them yourself if you can learn to reproduce the cardinal vowels, and can also produce nasal vowels. Or you could use this chart, where the ...
user6726's user avatar
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3 votes

Anunasika(Chandrabindu) in Vowels (Sanskrit)

Anunāsika is the Sanskrit name for what linguists call vowel nasalization. A vowel marked with a chandrabindu is pronounced with the soft palate lowered, allowing air to escape through your nose. It'...
Draconis's user avatar
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Pre-fortis clipping of /n/

The term ‘pre-fortis clipping’ refers not only to the shortening of vowels, but also any sonorants (i.e. approximants or nasals) that may intervene before the fortis obstruent in the coda of the ...
Araucaria - him's user avatar
3 votes
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Should secondary articulation in front of the uvular nasal have a sonic effect?

I suggest recording and measuring your measurements (but be careful to not totally believe the numbers). I found that in all cases including [n] vs. [nʷ], there was some difference in formants, though ...
user6726's user avatar
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3 votes

Do Nasal Consonants Require Nostrils?

Plugged nasals still involve the nasopharynx, even if air does not flow through the nares. The term "nasal" refers to a class of normal speech sounds where air does indeed flow through the nostrils, ...
user6726's user avatar
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2 votes

Anunasika(Chandrabindu) in Vowels (Sanskrit)

This paper by Cardona surveys the problem of determining the status of anunāsika versus anusvāra (I don't derive any firm conclusions from this, but it does lay out the textual facts). Pāṇini is ...
user6726's user avatar
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2 votes

autosegmental representations of floating features like voice/nasal

One of the canonical examples of "floating non-tonal feature" is [constricted pharynx] in the article "Emphasis harmony in a Modern Aramaic dialect" (Language 1984: 1-26). There are various analyses ...
user6726's user avatar
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2 votes

Are nasals stop consonants?

This being an obligatory answer to a question, we would have to know your instructor's ideology and instructional point – i.e. in the present instance, we can only offer reasonable interpretations of ...
user6726's user avatar
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2 votes
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Semi-nasalization of the preceding vowel

Standard IPA certainly would use a tilde over the vowel instead. But use of superscript "n" for nasalisation is often seen, e.g. in the most common systematic romanisation of Xiamen and Taiwanese ...
Michaelyus's user avatar
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2 votes

Semi-nasalization of the preceding vowel

As I understand your excerpt, they are talking about nasalization. Nasalization is transcribed with this symbol (upper tilde): ẽ. You can add parenthesis to indicate that it is a partially ...
amegnunsen's user avatar
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2 votes
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Tenuis nasal consonants

The term "tenuis" in linguistics is not an absolute phonetic description, it is a relative term, similar to "unmarked". The consonant b is voiced, the consonant p is not. When describing an instance ...
user6726's user avatar
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2 votes

Tenuis nasal consonants

Tenuis is a term used to refer to voiceless plosives [p, t, k], especially ones that are unaspirated, so it doesn't apply to [m], which is by definition voiced. Burmese has voiceless [m̥], but not ...
Nardog's user avatar
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2 votes
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/o/ -> /u/ change in Persian xānum خانم ‘mistress’

It's probably related to the nasal consonant /m/ at the end of the word. /xānom/ is the formal form of the word, which is spelled خانُم (though normally without the diacritic). /xānum/, is the ...
Microsoft Linux TM's user avatar
2 votes

When we breathe through the nose, do we normally make an unvoiced uvular nasal?

"Unvoiced uvular nasal" refers to a particular kind of language sound, just as "unvoiced bilabial fricative" (=[φ]) does. The physical action of articulating [φ] is similar to how ...
user6726's user avatar
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2 votes

Deviation in colloquial speech of nasal vowels in French

Admittedly, I am no expert on French, so take this answer with a grain of salt. This question seems quite subjective as well, so I may be completely off base in my analysis of what exactly is going on,...
ⰲⱁⰴⰰ's user avatar
1 vote

Does Tibetan have nasalized consonants, or is the nasalness on the vowels?

The main point that needs to be made is that Tibetan is a language family, although there is also a single written languages called (in English) Tibetan. As for the specific language that you are ...
user6726's user avatar
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1 vote
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What is the exact position of the tongue for [ n ] in these circumstances?

I understand the standard way of pronouncing n sound is to put my tongue behind the top teeth ... Although IPA [n] may refer to a dental sound (where the tongue forms a seal with the back of the top ...
Araucaria - him's user avatar
1 vote

What is the exact position of the tongue for [ n ] in these circumstances?

The standard way of pronouncing the sound [n] is, in part and approximately, to put your tongue behind the top teeth. When you say the English word "language", you are producing the sound [ŋ]...
user6726's user avatar
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1 vote

Differences between /ᵐb/ (prenasalization) and /mb/

There is no phonetic difference, but there is also no phonetic unity supposed ᵐb / mb are pronounced in many different ways across languages. On occasion, there is an audible contrast between two such ...
user6726's user avatar
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