7

I hadn't heard the term "statistical theory (of language)", but it seems to be a misnomer. I gather from your references that you take some data and use it to estimate the parameters of some statistical model. Model, not theory. We inherit our ideas about what empirical theories are like from the physical sciences, and a key property of those theories is ...


3

These are more or less like the word-sense disambiguation, anaphora resolution or co-reference resolution examples in the Winograd Schema Challenge and generally in natural language understanding. How far ahead do we look when parsing and understanding text? As you essentially show in your examples where the necessary information is not in the sentence, ...


2

Are you familiar with any of the HPSG or lexicalist approaches to NLP that came about in the 90s or anything? This is strictly non-chomsky, non-transformational but it at least would give you some kind of starting point with how NLP is done from more of a linguistics perspective. I'd suggest looking at ALE grammars, LinGo or anything like this. I am by no ...


1

Since you seem to be interested in reading, you may find the following overview of "The science of word recognition" (written in 2017, by Kevin Larson) to be an interesting read. Larson says that the best supported model of how words are read is parallel recognition of multiple letters. Larson also talks about the phenomenon of eye "saccades", which ...


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