7 votes
Accepted

How do natural languages prevent word ambiguity in "compound words"?

Natural languages don't do this, ambiguities happen. An example is the German word Staubecken that can be analysed in two ways: Stau-becken "pond, basin, dam reservoir" and Staub-ecken, ...
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5 votes
Accepted

Is there any natural language having minimal pairs over tongue root position?

Insofar as you've put creaky and breathy voice in one bin, and a three-way distinction in "ATR" in a second, you have described a situation that doesn't exist in any known language. There ...
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  • 68.8k
4 votes

Is language a formal system?

No, natural language is not a formal system. Some rather interesting theories about natural langages are formal systems. But to confuse a theory with the phenomena that it is a theory of is ...
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  • 12.3k
4 votes
Accepted

Is language a formal system?

The author has mistaken language and grammar, and that criticism isn't valid for any period of generative phonology. Grammar is a cognitive ability which can be modeled as a particular kind of formal ...
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4 votes

How do natural languages prevent word ambiguity in "compound words"?

How do natural languages like English or Spanish (or any other) deal with creating words so they don't run into this ambiguity problem? As jk said, they don't. Suppose I tell you that a door is "...
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  • 53.2k
4 votes

What do all languages have in common?

Well, the basics are the same: all languages have consonants and vowels, and always more consonants than vowel qualities. All of them have verbs and, slightly controversially, all of them have nouns. ...
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3 votes
Accepted

What do all languages have in common?

Any linguistic answer to this question has to be at least partly theory laden. There are many approaches to linguistic universals. The most general points would be: 1. All natural languages can be ...
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1 vote

What fraction of compound phonemes actually exist in natural language?

First, a word about what a phoneme is: a phoneme is "a sound" which a language uses as one of its primitive elements for constructing utterances. For instance /p/ in "paper, spit". It turns out that ...
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1 vote
Accepted

German corpus for grapheme-phoneme (G2P or P2G) mapping

The Bavarian Archive for Speech Signals, a CLARIN-D centre, has lots of corpora containing the acustic signal, phonetic transcription (in SAMPA), and orthographic transcription (that's what you call ...
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1 vote

Natural Language Processing Meta-Super-Dictionary

You have two input choices: 1. analyze dictionaries (wordnet, worknik or wiktionary), 2. use word embeddings (word2vec, glove, elmo). Use this data with a WSD (word sense disambiguation) solution. ...
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