8 votes
Accepted

Are English 'gay' and Norwegian 'gøy' cognates?

According to the Norske Akademis Ordbok, gøy is from English “gay”.
melissa_boiko's user avatar
6 votes

Could Danish, Swedish and Norwegian theoretically be counted as dialects of the same language?

Classification of something as a language or dialect is a socio-political decision, so to decide whether Danish, Swedish, and Norwegian should be separate dialects or separate languages or even not ...
joshisanonymous's user avatar
6 votes
Accepted

Origin of the word/root 'del'

These words are related, but they do not have any known cognates outside of Germanic and Balto-Slavic. “Proto-Indo-European *dʰayl-, *dʰoyl-“ (as posited on Wikipedia) is highly uncertain. It has been ...
fdb's user avatar
  • 24.2k
5 votes
Accepted

Norwegian Translation Codes (no, nn, nb) - Which to use on a website?

I assume your concern is with regard to Norwegians and not compliance with some statutory requirement (if there is any such requirement, which I doubt, I am certain that it wasn't arrived at by ...
user6726's user avatar
  • 83.1k
5 votes

Peculiarities of English as spoken/written by Norwegians

What about translating literally some Norwegian expressions? I've heard someone says "it wasn't only-only" before now, with a thick accent of course. "only-only" is not a ...
Omar and Lorraine's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

Qualifying similarities between languages - e.g., German and Norwegian

There are two reasons why German and Norwegian seem similar. One is that they come from the same language spoken a few thousands of years ago. The second is that German had a more modern influence (...
user6726's user avatar
  • 83.1k
4 votes

Origin of the word/root 'del'

They definitely do go to the same common ancestor, just the first etymology you found does not go deep enough. Norwegian del is reconstructed to proto-germanic dailiz, but that originates from PIE *...
Eleshar's user avatar
  • 2,363
4 votes
Accepted

Is wrong article use a matter of pronunciation or grammar?

The question draws a false albeit common dichotomy between grammar and pronunciation. Grammar includes the facts that in English we say "I saw your uncle" but not *"I your uncle saw", which is about ...
user6726's user avatar
  • 83.1k
3 votes

Norwegian Translation Codes (no, nn, nb) - Which to use on a website?

As recommended by W3C, you should be using nb as it is more specific than the macrolanguage no. Use macrolanguages with care. Some language subtags have a Scope field set to macrolanguage, ie. this ...
soliz's user avatar
  • 131
3 votes
Accepted

Possessive pronoun position in north germanic languages

I would check your assumptions of what the order is in the various languages. See this paper, which is not about history, but indicates that pre- and post-nominal order co-exists in Norwegian, Faroese ...
user6726's user avatar
  • 83.1k
3 votes

Learning Bokmål Norwegian through a book on Nynorsk

Nynorsk and Bokmål are just two different forms for writing the same language (or at least its dialects). Bokmål (book language) is based on the Danish writing system. Of course, it is not exactly ...
Ergative Man's user avatar
  • 1,436
3 votes
Accepted

How similar are Norwegian and Swedish compared to Dutch and Flemish / German?

Tang & van Heuven 2009 "Mutual intelligibility of Chinese dialects experimentally tested" address this kind of question experimentally for Chinese dialects. They do not come up with percentages ...
user6726's user avatar
  • 83.1k
2 votes

Similarity between Norwegian and Danish compared to other languages?

The map question is apparently based on this, where the conclusions (apparently) are based on lexicostatistical computation. This probably does allow you to say compare the relatedness-numbers for ...
user6726's user avatar
  • 83.1k
2 votes
Accepted

How did Norwegian "huske" derive from ON "hugsa"?

The addition of the letter s forms an iterative verb. There are more examples in Germanic languages, e.g. Low German hoppen "to hop", High German hopsen "to bounce, to lollop". The second step is ...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
2 votes

IPA transcriptions for Norwegian

One reason why there are not is that pronunciation is a bit dialect-idiosyncratic (sverd is [sʋæɖ] or [sʋæɾd], depending on dialect). Bokmål and Nynorsk are really written standards, and the 1sg ...
user6726's user avatar
  • 83.1k
2 votes

Is wrong article use a matter of pronunciation or grammar?

You may be making some confusion, and likely so is the other person. In English, a vs an (and the pronounced in its two different ways, too, which is similar but just not reflected in spelling) is a ...
LjL's user avatar
  • 1,849
1 vote

Origin of -s verbs in Norwegian and Swedish

Well, my guess is that it comes from the -sk ending in Old Norse (modern Icelandic -st ending). As found in the famous Vǫlospá verses: Brœðr munu BERJASK (Modern Icelandic: Bræður munu BERJAST), ...
Ergative Man's user avatar
  • 1,436
1 vote

Are English 'gay' and Norwegian 'gøy' cognates?

According to Språkrådet's and Universitet i Bergen's ordboka, gøy comes from English 'guy', meaning 'make fun on', from Dutch 'guich', the etymology of which I do not know: fra engelsk guy 'gjøre ...
Tommi's user avatar
  • 161
1 vote

Learning Bokmål Norwegian through a book on Nynorsk

It is possible to translate from Nynorsk to Bokmål, or Nynorsk to Chinese, or any other arrangement you want. This article discusses machine translation between Nynorsk and Bokmål. It is also possible ...
user6726's user avatar
  • 83.1k
1 vote

How can I distinguish modern Scandinavian languages at a glance?

The Twitter user incunabula tweeted (https://twitter.com/incunabula/status/1560597822151356416) a diagram with an algorithm to distinguish between European languages. The feature that - in this ...
Finn Årup Nielsen's user avatar

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