Skip to main content
15 votes
Accepted

Does the French word for Friday, "vendredi", come from the Latin "Veneris" or the old Norse "Vanadis"?

Very unlikely! While the phonetic similarities are real, the old Norse name of the weekday etymologically goes back to Frig's day, and not Freyja's day. The actual form of the Norse word is ...
Darkgamma's user avatar
  • 1,427
12 votes

Development of Old Norse 2nd and 3rd person sg. (present indicative) forms of "to be"

It is certainly puzzling, and not only to you. The problem has frustrated many scholars and is thus described on page 724 of The Nordic Languages: An International Handbook of the History of the North ...
pinnerup's user avatar
  • 1,013
12 votes

Development of Old Norse 2nd and 3rd person sg. (present indicative) forms of "to be"

I am not an expert on Old Norse, but my guess that in Old Norse happened something similar as in the development of the German language: The second person singular acquired a new -t from the start of ...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
10 votes

Is there any superstrate influence of Old East Norse left in East Slavic languages?

The number of North Germanic loans in the East Slavic languages is rather low (the most critical estimate is around thirty). For example, Panzer 2002 mentions 34 words (V. Kiparsky) or 30 words (...
Alex B.'s user avatar
  • 8,744
9 votes

Does the French word for Friday, "vendredi", come from the Latin "Veneris" or the old Norse "Vanadis"?

The etymology of vendredi is completely straightforward. It is from “Veneris dies” (the day of Venus), well attested in Roman texts as the name for one of the seven days of the “planetary” week.
fdb's user avatar
  • 24.3k
8 votes
Accepted

Old Norse, 'r' vs 'ʀ'?

r and ʀ represent two different Elder Futhark runes, generally called *raido and *algiz respectively. The latter is used for a sound derived from Proto-Germanic *z, so many people (including me) ...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 67.1k
7 votes

How are bindrunes read?

Bindrunes, or ligatures, are rather rare in ON. They are far more common in neo-pagan uses for runes, but that's nothing to do with Linguistics. So this answer will focus on attested, historical use ...
Omar and Lorraine's user avatar
6 votes

The Pronunciation of G in Old English

Many of the surviving Scandinavian languages have palatalised g in similar environments, but loan words like give (which replaced the native word, which gave dialectal yive) show that at the point of ...
Tristan's user avatar
  • 8,809
4 votes

The Pronunciation of G in Old English

No, it is not related to Old Norse, it is inherited from Anglo-Frisian. Old Norse supplied some words with "hard g" and "hard k" in environments where Anglo-Frisian developed ...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

Why are Proto-Germanic *fraiwą and Old Norse frjó / fræ cognate?

The development of Proto-Germanic ai in the North Germanic languages is very complex. It depends on a number of factors (stressed/unstressed, followed by w, r/R, h etc.) - see e.g. Sandøy 2017 PGmc. ...
Alex B.'s user avatar
  • 8,744
3 votes

How to convert masculine Old Norse dwarf names to feminine markers?

You seem to have picked up on the easiest pattern for this: Weak masculine nouns end in -i, weak feminine nouns end in -a. Weak nouns are easier because there's only one main pattern for each gender. ...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 67.1k
3 votes

How do you translate academic runic encodings to runes (ᚠᚢᚦᚨᚱᚲ)?

"Runes" aren't a single writing system: there are several variants, used in different places at different times to transcribe different languages. It's like asking "how do I convert text written in ...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 67.1k
2 votes
Accepted

Bugarth - Celtic, Old Norse, both or neither?

Could these two words: stem from the same PIE root, and survived relatively unskathed have been borrowed one from the other, making one or both of the etymologies dubious have been ...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 67.1k
2 votes
Accepted

How did Norwegian "huske" derive from ON "hugsa"?

The addition of the letter s forms an iterative verb. There are more examples in Germanic languages, e.g. Low German hoppen "to hop", High German hopsen "to bounce, to lollop". The second step is ...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
2 votes

Old Norse name for Balts (Baltic people)?

Not exactly what you're asking, but an Old English text reporting the journey of two Scandinavians through Finnish and Baltic territory uses the phrase "Estland" for the region on the east coast of ...
William Merrill's user avatar
2 votes

Markers for feminine and masculine names in Old Norse?

Adding to the comprehensive answer above (I don't have enough reputation to comment), feminine names also often end in -un(n). Some examples taken from the sagas and Norse mythology are Guðrún, Þorunn,...
William Merrill's user avatar
2 votes

Old English forms of address

In Anglo-Saxon lēof 'beloved, dear' was used in a similar manner, though it was not as formal. e.g. "lēofa Bēowulf" 'dear Beowulf', "lēof ealdormann" 'Mister Alderman'. In Old Norse some sources have ...
Mark Beadles's user avatar
  • 6,860
1 vote
Accepted

What is the origin of the Icelandic Ð, ð, eth?

The modern Icelandic alphabet was introduced by Danish linguist Rasmus Rask – and perhaps a few colleagues – in the 19th century. He was trying to respect the 12th century text The First Grammatical ...
Luboš Motl's user avatar
1 vote

Help me find an early Old Norse dictionary (or even a grammar)

The works of Jakob Jakobsen might be of interest to you. Not strictly Old Norse but the vast majority of the words in the following publications are of Old West Norse origins: An Etymological ...
Colin Dickie's user avatar
1 vote

How did one pronounce an 'r' in Old English?

It was definitely an alveolar trill [r] (or flap [ɾ]) at the syllable onset, as in, in prevocalic positions. However, in non-prevocalic positions (in positions where a non-rhotic speaker would elide /...
Stephanus Tavilrond's user avatar

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible