7 votes
Accepted

For each IPA phone, are there animations or videos that depict the vocal tract during articulation?

I should think that there are a number of sources. For example, the University of Sheffield offers videos for every IPA sound. If the sounds of English, Spanish and German are enough for you, the ...
  • 346
6 votes
Accepted

Good audio resources for the ejective consonants

The best reference source is the UCLA phonetics collection, here (you will notice a lot of other interesting sound categories). I have strong reservations about using Wiki exemplars which are not ...
  • 73k
5 votes

Lists of linguistic resources

List of resources PHOIBLE phonological database Surrey Morphology Group databases Konstanz Universals Archive Encyclopedia of Linguistic Laws and the Laws in Quantitative Linguistics Glottolog
5 votes

Online etymology dictionary for English (more explanatory than Etymonline and OED)

It is possible the OED version online is abridged. I think I read something of the sort on the website, but unfortunately I can't access it any more via your link (though I could at first, strange...)....
  • 4,239
5 votes

Verifying these resources are accurate written representations for each language using Latin script

Xhosa, Zulu, Swahili, Yoruba, Kele, and the vast majority of other Bantu (and Niger-Congo) languages are written in the Latin script. The ones in the south that have clicks tend to use the "spare" ...
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4 votes

For each IPA phone, are there animations or videos that depict the vocal tract during articulation?

Seeing Speech is a remarkable site that has MRI, UTI and animations for most IPA sounds.
4 votes

Is there a website where you can find cognates of certain word in other IE branches?

You can look up PIE roots from Walde-Pokorny here. This contains a link to a language index, which could lead you to the Latin list, although you'd have to know that facio is related to putrefacio and ...
  • 73k
4 votes

Massive Open Online Courses on linguistics

I also faced the exact same problem. Unfortunately there doesn't seem to be that many online resources for this field, and the existing ones aren't really that good (e.g. the one by Leiden University, ...
  • 573
4 votes
Accepted

Which free resource to find word frequency?

Word frequency is only a proxy for word knowledge. For the English language, there are data available on word prevalence, i.e., on how many people know a certain word. You can find Measures of word ...
3 votes
Accepted

Is there a website where you can find cognates of certain word in other IE branches?

I think you can also use the Indo-European section of the Tower of Babel database, which is also based on Pokorny, but only with caution, since they sometimes depart from the mainstream ...
3 votes

Chart with audible sounds pronounced, for Proto-Indo-European?

No. Native speakers have been in short supply for the past few millenia. What you can do is decide what phonetic (IPA) value you want to assign to e.g. "p" and listen to that via an authoritative ...
  • 73k
3 votes

Are there standard test data sets for English stemmers / lemmatisers?

There is a list of vocabulary and the output from testing the snowball algorithm available at the Snowball Github page, though it is not precisely human tested but it's good for testing you stemmer. ...
  • 1,217
3 votes

Lists of linguistic resources

CLARIN (European Research Infrastructure for Language Resources and Technology) entry points: Virtual Language Observatory (VLO): A search engine for language resources TeLeMaCo: Teaching and ...
3 votes

Where to find frequency list of English words from newspapers, books and magazines?

This question hasn't been updated in a while. Google also released a 1 Billion Word Benchmark Corpus: https://github.com/tensorflow/models/tree/master/research/lm_1b. It has a vocabulary size of about ...
  • 576
3 votes

Word Lists of Various Languages

FAIR have trained word embedding models for hundreds of languages, with the side effect that they have compiled words lists. Wikipedia only, 300+ languages fasttext.cc/docs/en/crawl-vectors.html / ...
3 votes
Accepted

Verifying these resources are accurate written representations for each language using Latin script

I don't know about the current state of Kele, but the odds are good that this is how the language is currently written (it is a relatively recent translation). Likewise, Navajo. In general, these are ...
  • 73k
3 votes

Where online can I find a list of all the Hapax Legomena in the Hebrew Bible?

Here are some leads found by skimming the Hebrew versions of relevant articles: Your original Encyclopedia Judaica article on hapax legomena The Hebrew Wikipedia article on hapax legomena in the ...
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3 votes
Accepted

What has happened to the World Phonotactics Database?

I've checked with the maintainers. They tell me there is currently no official version of the phonotactics database online. However, they are still actively expanding it and there are plans to build a ...
2 votes

Lists of linguistic resources

The Oxford Reference Encyclopedia of Linguistics, the Elsevier Encyclopedia of Language and Linguistics, the International Encyclopedia of Linguistics, and any Oxford, Routledge, or Wiley-Blackwell ...
2 votes

Where to find frequency list of English words from newspapers, books and magazines?

Expanding on Otavio Macedo's answer, if you just want plain txt files containing English words sorted by frequency without having to analyze Google Ngram Viewer's dataset yourself, Natural Language ...
  • 121
2 votes

Online Modern Greek dictionary that puts imperfective and ("dependent") perfective verb stems together?

As @hippietrail mentioned, Wiktionary does: https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/βλέπω#Conjugation So does the Triantafyllides Institute's dictionary, which is the only one of the three major contemporary ...
2 votes

Online etymology dictionary for English (more explanatory than Etymonline and OED)

It seems that you're really more interested in reconstructions than more meaningful and evidence-based etymologies. Maybe, you would find this English-PIE translator useful: http://indo-european.info/...
2 votes

context free grammar ressource

GPSG, the book (Generalized Phrase Structure Grammar, by Gazdar, Klein, Pullum, and Sag) gives a context free psg theory of English which, from the standpoint of syntactic theory, is a great ...
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2 votes

Massive Open Online Courses on linguistics

MIT's OpenCourseWare has a large number of linguistics courses. The are many on language theory and analysis (phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics) and some on NLP.
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2 votes

Are there any equivalent of oxforddictionaries.com/definition/ in Arabic?

Try Wiktionary. They have definitions, pronounciation, declension, etymology, ... for a fair amount of words in most major languages. You can also view the entries in languages other than English.
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2 votes

Are there any equivalent of oxforddictionaries.com/definition/ in Arabic?

المعاني is such a site. Go directly to the link in the menu labelled تركي if you want to include definitions in Turkish; انجليزي for English. Unfortunately, not all of the definitions include thorough ...
2 votes
Accepted

Tags in opencorpora Russian corpus.

They call it "gramemes". They roughly can be described tags. The full list of these is located here, and the description (pretty vague) is in column #4 "Описание" ("Description"). The "gramemes" in ...
2 votes

Which free resource to find word frequency?

If what you really want is Wiktionary's frequency list, you can get that by taking the various Wiktionary pages linked from the overview page and splicing them together. However, be careful which ...
  • 57.5k
2 votes

Sources on statistics of phonological properties of languages

Since you did not mention it in the question: The World Atlas of Linguistic Structures (WALS) contains some of the data you are looking for. Specifically, you can find information on the size of ...
2 votes

Sources on statistics of phonological properties of languages

The arrangement of phonemes within syllables and words, which is what much of your question appears to be about, is known as 'phonotactics'. The World phonotactic database would therefore be likely to ...

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