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I see different possibilities: Either the "w" was copied from German spelling, where "w" was pronounced /v/ (at least in the dialects or regions which came in contact with Poland). Or, when "w"-spelling came into use, it was pronounced /w/, but the pronunciation evolved to /v/, while spelling remained unchanged. Or else: ...


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Your examples are not about ease of pronunciation. There is a general but mistaken belief that it is "hard" to say forms that deviate from the social norm of a language. "She be" vs "She is" is a case in point. It's just as easy to say "She be" as it is to say "She is". You might not be familiar with dialects ...


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The Spanish use of y vs. e and o vs. u can be classified as an example of sandhi and dissimilation. Sandhi is a pronunciation change caused by contact between words (or morphemes), usually in a way that can be thought of as making the pronunciation "easier" in some way. Dissimilation is a change of two similar sounds to less similar sounds. Your ...


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