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4

Is it just a coincidence that English is the only major language that used all these letters and no more in its orthography? Is it a coincidence? No. But that's not the right test, because there are other letters that are not core to the orthographies of all major languages. (k, y, x and q, for example). A more consistent test then would be if the letter ...


13

Despite its name, the ISO Basic Latin Alphabet isn't particularly concerned with representing Latin. It was developed in the modern day, so the fact that I~J and U~V weren't consistently distinguished until the 18th century isn't relevant—they're consistently distinguished now. But the observation that the ISO Basic Latin Alphabet aligns exactly with what's ...


2

As I look back on this with the benefit of hindsight, I see that I wrote a lengthy answer about the benefits and drawbacks of this notation, but didn't say anything about where it came from. As far as I know, this notation (e̯ a̯ o̯ for *h₁ *h₂ *h₃) is part of Anixx's personal transcription system, used in their answers here. I've never seen it used ...


2

Tl;dr I wouldn't attribute it to quill pens at all. One important thing to remember is that spelling has not always been uniform. Unlike many other languages, English has never had a central authority that decides what is proper English and what isn't; in the early 19th century, Noah Webster decided to overhaul spelling in his dictionary, and because of that ...


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