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26 votes
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What is the function of the soft sign (Ь) in Russian?

WARNING: The question is sooo many-sided, it is very wide and can be split into at least 3 different questions. I'll answer it all, don't tell me later that you haven't been warned the answer would be ...
Yellow Sky's user avatar
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14 votes
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What are the differences between palatal consonant and palatalized consonant?

Theoretically, there is a difference in most cases. In IPA, the raised j symbol <ʲ>, represents "palatalization," or a "palatal secondary articulation." The concept of a "secondary articulation" ...
brass tacks's user avatar
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10 votes

From Italian to Spanish, consonant + "i" goes to consonant + "l"?

Spanish and Italian are both languages descended from Latin. As such, many of their words are cognate sharing a common Latin ancestor, but the sounds in these words evolved over time and evolved ...
iacobo's user avatar
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7 votes
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How are the palatal approximant and palatalization different in Slavic languages?

An old question, but perhaps the answer might still be useful. First, I believe that regarding Slavic languages, iotation is considered a feature of vowels (iotated vowels are preceded by [j]), while ...
Svatoslav Komínek's user avatar
4 votes

What is the function of the soft sign (Ь) in Russian?

From the point of view of the spelling, Ь simply means "the previous consonant should be palatalized". See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Palatalization_(phonetics) to learn what palatalization is, it'...
Constantine Geist's user avatar
4 votes

Why does Polish have male and female accents?

I have known a few languages other than Polish throughout my lifetime, which include Russian, English, French, Greek, and Hebrew, but in none of them have I observed any consistent difference between ...
drammock's user avatar
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4 votes

Exceptions to Intrasyllabic Synharmony in modern Czech?

The so-called "Sound Law" and the thing that was regular is 1500 or more years old, when it was a general rule of articulation in the proto-language. It was a subconscious, unavoidable "...
user6726's user avatar
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4 votes
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Why are palatalized consonants commonly accompanied by stretched lips?

If the consonant in question is neither labial nor labialized, the lip position accompanying its pronunciation is characterized only by that of the neighboring vowel, it doesn't depend on whether the ...
Yellow Sky's user avatar
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4 votes
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Slavic second palatalization

You probably took the description of the second Slavic palatalization from some simplified description. It isn't the case that it would only happen before ě (yat') and not before i. It happened before ...
Vladimir F Героям слава's user avatar
3 votes

Examples of ě₁ palatalization

What is often marked ě in Slavic studies was probably actually a long e (*ē, with some unspecified degree of openness). I am not sure there is any widely accepted intermediate *ě₁ that would be ...
Vladimir F Героям слава's user avatar
3 votes
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Why is there a Second Palatalization in personal nouns but not in non-personal nouns in Nominative Plural in Slavic languages

That's not a common-Slavic, but purely Polish phenomenon, since Polish distinguishes masculine persons' vs. other nouns' declension patterns in the plural (human vs. nonhuman). In other Slavic ...
Yellow Sky's user avatar
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3 votes

Is this diagram accurate for [ɾʲ]

The rhotics in Irish differ significantly from the other alveolar consonants in their production. First off, be aware that fortis /rʲ/ has mostly merged with fortis /rˠ/ (which in most dialects has ...
Janus Bahs Jacquet's user avatar
3 votes

Catalan assimilation of 's' /s/ → [ʃ] after palatal consonants 'ny' /ɲ/ and 'll' /ʎ/

I think palatalization of final s in such environments is the most common outcome, and I wouldn't trust native speakers not versed on linguistics since the difference is not phonemic, let alone ...
zest16's user avatar
  • 131
3 votes

palatalization and consonant inventories

First, you should keep palatal and palatalized separate. Norwegian has a palatalized fricative [ç] but doesn't have palatalized consonants, likewise Sanskrit, likewise, Hungarian and North Saami have ...
user6726's user avatar
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2 votes

From Italian to Spanish, consonant + "i" goes to consonant + "l"?

Just for (a random) curiosity :D : Latin pl, cl and fl bacame [ʃ] in portuguese (written ch). Example: planum > chão (doublet of "plano") plattus > chato (doublet of "prato") plenum > cheio (...
Ergative Man's user avatar
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2 votes

From Italian to Spanish, consonant + "i" goes to consonant + "l"?

I would say, /l/ in specific Latin clusters was simply vocalized in Italian. That means the consonant became a vowel, which is not all that uncommon for a sound like this. Take for example r-...
unknown_person_1000's user avatar
2 votes

Is there a difference between /ɕ/ and /sʲ/?

Per the official IPA definitions, ɕ and ʑ stand for alveolo-palatal fricatives, and sʲ and zʲ stand for palatalized alveolar fricatives. The official definitions are vague and so do not fully specify ...
brass tacks's user avatar
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2 votes
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Does loss of conditioning envt automatically create new phonemes?

The answer depends on which definition of "phoneme" you use. Under the classical taxonomic definition, where you analyze actual sounds into a more abstract system, two sounds are allophones if their ...
user6726's user avatar
  • 83.2k
2 votes
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Catalan assimilation of 's' /s/ → [ʃ] after palatal consonants 'ny' /ɲ/ and 'll' /ʎ/

L’Atles Lingüístic del Domini Català Native speakers Here are some self-aware discussions by native speakers noting the phenomenon: https://www.racocatala.cat/forums/fil/176056/grups-lls-i-nys ...
iacobo's user avatar
  • 3,132
2 votes

Can dentals be palatalized?

There is certainly no phonetic reason that dentals cannot be palatalised. Phonologically it's trickier. Contrasts between dentals and alveolars are already unusual (even the contrast between /θ/ & ...
Tristan's user avatar
  • 8,809
2 votes

Can dentals be palatalized?

It is hard to say. Phoible suggests some candidate languages. In some cases (t̪ʲ|tʲ) the description in the original source is not clear enough that they (the compilers) can decide whether the segment ...
user6726's user avatar
  • 83.2k
2 votes

How can the continuum s-sʲ-ç-ɕ-ʃ-ʂ be described in technical terms?

From a diachronic perspective, this is simply retraction vs advancement. The place of articulation appears as the most "important" part of such a series, and so that's how the phenomenon is ...
Michaelyus's user avatar
  • 7,516
1 vote

Why does Polish have male and female accents?

There are no male or female accents in Polish. The way words are pronounced by men and women is exactly the same. If you are hearing differences in how men and women speak Polish, then I would assume ...
Alichino's user avatar
  • 127
1 vote

palatalization of plosive consonants

First, it is not true that plosives are only heard when they are released. VC formant transitions also exist, and can be used to identify consonants. In fact, when you encounter rounding or ...
user6726's user avatar
  • 83.2k
1 vote

What is the difference in articulation between /CjV/ and /CʲV/?

There is no IPA principle that prefers superscript rather than regular j based on pronunciation alone. Both [pj] and [pʲ] identify the same phonetic fact, but differ in phonological analysis. In ...
user6726's user avatar
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