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2

While certainly not the common term in contemporary speech, “روزگار” can mean “wind”, account to the Steingass dictionary (which covers older usages). Here is the pertinent entry: روزگار rozgār, روزگاران rozgārān, The world; fortune; time, season, an age; day; vanity; wind, air; slaughter; service, employ, situation; labour, toil; occasion; earning; (...


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The semantic shift seems to be: time > weather > wind For the first step compare Latin tempus “time” > French temps (“time, weather”). For the second compare German Wetter (“weather”) with Russian veter (“wind”). The Persian rūzgār is a common word meaning “time”. To my knowledge it is not used for “wind” in Persian in any period. This meaning is ...


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