10

/ʎ/ has the contact with the hard palate, /l̠ʲ/ has the contact with the alveolar ridge (albeit towards the back of the alveolar ridge, and with the body of the tongue raised towards the hard palate)


9

Also note that even if they were the exact same thing, ʎ is a single symbol while l̠ʲ is a symbol with two diacritics; if a phoneme is common or high-profile enough, it will often get its own simplex symbol, even if it could already be represented by some combination of diacritics before. By way of extreme example, remember that the IPA has diacritics for ...


2

You are wrong! Sometimes. You can detect "it" by looking at the vowel just before the stop closure. This paper may be useful (there are pictures). Compare the non-glottalized non-creaky example with the 3 examples with glottalization and/or creakiness, and notice the wide spacing of the glottal pulses in the latter trio. For a more expanded / ...


1

If you speak British English (RP), Americans will say "Hmmm, he speaks British English. I wonder if he is from Britain". If you speak Geordie, you'll need to repeat yourself – but I'm not sure if you would call that "British English". Even Derry English is sort of comprehensible to Americans. But I think it isn't consonant pronunciation ...


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