11 votes

Pronunciation of D sound in British English

American English speakers tend to reduce /d/ to a flapped [ɾ] between vowels, while British English speakers generally don't. This means an RP /d/ can sound a lot "stronger" than an American ...
  • 53.9k
10 votes

Pronunciation of D sound in British English

In the examples you cite, there is no [d] in most dialects of American English, it is replaced with the flap [ɾ]. Thus "writer" and "rider" are phonetically identical, though given ...
  • 70k
6 votes
Accepted

Does any language have Final-Obstruent voicing?

There are two known cases in synchronic phonology. The first is Lezgian, where plain voiceless stops become voiced word-finally, resulting in (sing~pl) alternations like k’arab ~ k’arabar 'bone(s)', ...
  • 70k
4 votes

Does any language have Final-Obstruent voicing?

On an empirical level, phonemic voicing of word-final obstruent consonants appears to exist in some languages (in Sanskrit and in varieties of Polish spoken in some regions such as Poznań-Kraków; for ...
  • 16.7k
2 votes

Does any language have Final-Obstruent voicing?

Final obstruent voicing is thought to have happened in early Latin (or its ancestor Proto-Italic). There are inscriptional forms like FECED "made", where the final -D continues the Proto-...
  • 10.5k
1 vote

Why does /ɑ/ sounds so similar to [ɔ]?

The pronunciation of the sole low vowel, in languages that have just one low vowel, is highly variable compared to mid and high vowels, and this is related to the fact that back / round contrast in ...
  • 70k

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