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Smacking your lips together is also a potential sound. I do this when i call my friends and its loud enough to distinguish.


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I don't know how homogenous is TextGrid across different tools that use it, but there is a Python package, pympi which can be used to read Praat TextGrid files. In particular, pympi.Praat.TextGrid class can be instantiated to read TextGrid files.


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Xmin and xmax are the starting times in seconds, within the file (which goes from 0 to 4.360703 seconds), and ORT-MAU tells you the same thing (in this instance), but then tells you the time periods of the individual words (where xmax-xmin is the duration of the word). So you would be interested in the texts “trial” and “offer” (not necessarily intervals [7] ...


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To whom it may concern, u is a cardinal vowel which is sonorant while w is a semivowel or approximant in the sense that the articulators approach each other but do not touch and do not form an obstruction.However, the two sounds have got commonalities one of which is lip-rounding or both are back.


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You have to know the vocabulary of phonetic properties, or at least the relevant subset. If you look at the IPA chart, the descriptions of rows and columns are given, although oddly you have to work a bit harder to get "voiced" and "voiceless" from the chart. Your textbook will probably also give you a list of terms. You just check what ...


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Since the question is apparently about the letter ɧ and not a sound of a specific dialect of a language, we have to answer the question first according to some system of standards. It is part of the IPA: to get an authoritative view of what the thing sounds like, go to the International Phonetic Association (webpage) and see what the experts say. Look for ɧ ...


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The situation with VOT of word-final plosives is that you can measure it, although in some cases the value might be infinite. VOT isn't a thing that exists or doesn't exist, it's a measurement. The main reason why word-final VOT isn't a big topic of conversation is the lack of voicing after the stop (hence the infinite VOT), hence /d/ and /t/ are identical w....


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Pursuant to comments: whenever you use Draw in Praat, always Erase first, since otherwise it uses the previous drawing.


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For most languages, fully phonetic is not that much of a sensible goal. In general, languages aren’t understood in phonetic but rather in phonemic terms. The set of phonemes of a language is the collection of sounds that a speaker would usually differentiate as different sounds. For example, the first sounds in Kate and gate would be differentiated by ...


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