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No. In the vast majority of contexts, glide and semivowel are synonymous. See e.g. Ladefoged & Johnson (2015: 191), Rogers (2000: 184), Ball & Rahilly (1999: 51). Definitions of glide that somewhat differ from that of semivowel are sometimes encountered (e.g. Catford 2001: 68, Crystal 2008: 211), but even they don't match the definition in your ...


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Affricated realization of /t/ is characteristic of (certain varieties of) London speech, i.e. Cockney. Wells (1982: 31) writes: A common allophone of /t/ in a London accent is a heavily affricated [ts], thus [tsɑɪʔ ~ tsɑɪts] tight, [ˈphʰɑːtsi] party. To an American ear, as mentioned above, this evokes the stereotype of effeminacy, if the speaker is a man; ...


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The notion of a "phonetic consonant" as distinct from a "phonological consonant" is rather anomalous. "Consonant" is a kind of segment, as is "vowel", and all three terms (including "segment") are phonological concepts. Phoneticians don't define consonants, or vowels, they take those phonological units for ...


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Standard Mandarin's monophthongs in the usual five vowel analysis /i, u, y, ə, a/ (Pinyin i, u, ü, e, a) [and even if you include the apical vowel /ɨ / or /ɹ̩~ɻ̩/ or /z̩~ʐ̩/, Pinyin i] mean that /o/ and /e/ are only present in diphthongs /ou̯, jou̯, wo, je, ɥe, ei̯, wei̯/ (Pinyin: ou, iou, uo, ie, üe [xue, jue, que, yue], ei, uei [written as wei or ui]), bar ...


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RP's DRESS vowel is [ɛ]. Its FACE diphthong could be analysed as [ei] or [eɪ] (depending on whether the syllable is open or closed and whether the speaker is a HAPPY-tenser), in which case [e] occurs in diphthongs but not alone. Mind you, those diphthongs could instead be regarded as starting at [ɛ].


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RP has [aɪ] and [aʊ] but no [a]. Phonemically you could analyse these as /æɪ/ or /ɑɪ/, or /æʊ/ or /ɑʊ/ respectively though


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Attic Greek lacked /w/ and /j/, but had diphthongs /aw/, /ew/, /aj/, /oj/. (It also lacked a short /u/, if you prefer to write /au eu/.)


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In a comment, Janus Bahs Jacquet wrote: Your vocal cords usually close when they’re not in use (to close off access to your windpipe and prevent things getting into your throat). Pronouncing a vowel without a glottal stop requires first opening the cords, then starting the vowel; with a glottal stop, you basically open the cords by pushing the air needed to ...


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In good boy, /ɡʊb bɔɪ/, we see that the last consonant of good has become a /b/. In isolation the last consonant of good would be a /d/. If we give these two phonemes their Voice Place Manner labels, /d/ would be a ᴠᴏɪᴄᴇᴅ ᴅᴇɴᴛᴀʟ ᴘʟᴏsɪᴠᴇ and /b/ would be a ᴠᴏɪᴄᴇᴅ ʙɪʟᴀʙɪᴀʟ ᴘʟᴏsɪᴠᴇ. So we can see that whilst the last consonant of good is still voiced and still ...


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It is questionable whether there is such a thing as "assimilation of manner" in the same sense that there is assimilation of place. Assimilation of place traditionally refers to wholesale shift in POA as represented in the IPA charts, to t → p, p → k and so on: columns of cells identify a "place". "Manner" cross-classifies rows ...


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