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Can [ə] exist as an allophone of /ɑ/?

Any vowel could reduce to schwa. Whether or not schwa is a separate phoneme (Berber) or is purely-derived (Russian) depends on the details of the language. The standard claim for Georgian is that ...
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is /t͡sʼ/ deaffricated to [sʼ] in these recordings?

As a prelude, if you think that there is [ts'] anywhere in Georgia, you should provide a recording of unmodified [ts'] for comparison, especially an intervocalic one. Shosted & Chikovani provide ...
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4 votes

What is the relationship between on-glide/off-glide of a phone and the transition period between articulation of phones?

There are two candidate terms. One is "coarticulation", which focuses on the articulatory cause of the transitional acoustic properties that exist in sounds in sequence. The other is "...
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4 votes

Correlation Between Voicing and Place of Articulation?

A better way to put it is that it's more difficult to maintain voicing in stops at the back of the mouth. Voicing requires a drop in pressure across the glottis, and stops close off the oral cavity. ...
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1 vote

Devoicing vs voiceless fricative

The usage difference between [w̥] and [ʍ] is primarily in the phonological status of the segment. Given a choice between representing a phoneme with a bare symbol versus with a symbol plus diacritic, ...
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3 votes

Devoicing vs voiceless fricative

Whether there is a meaningful difference between a devoiced approximant and a voiceless fricative is an unsettled question in phonetics. No language is found to make a phonemic contrast between such ...
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How to read a spectrogram?

In the first spectrogram you can see two different segments /S1-S1-S2/ the third segment seems an strident sound "s, sh" or something similar (because it shows an extremely turbulent ...
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0 votes

Is IPA obsolete?

The IPA clearly plays an important role: we need to be able to write pronunciation in an unambiguous way. But maybe we can improve on it. First of all, IPA looks like a math formula, with all its ...
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5 votes
Accepted

Why the phonetic /ɔ/ is used in totally two different position?

The first thing that you should note is that the transcriptions (from dictionary.com) are sometimes in error. Example, top in the provided recording does not have the vowel [ɒ], in fact they seem a ...
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5 votes

Why the phonetic /ɔ/ is used in totally two different position?

Dialect differences. In many dialects, especially non-rhotic ones, the vowels in NORTH and THOUGHT are the same. In others, NORTH is more similar to GOAT. This dictionary seems to be based on the ...
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-1 votes

Alternatives to IPA?

Here's another option: the Musa Alphabet. It's not based on the Roman alphabet at all, which leads to less confusion and clearer features. You can read all about it at www.musa.bet. And here's a ...
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-1 votes

Is there a featural equivalent of the International Phonetic Alphabet?

Here's another option: the Musa Alphabet. It's not based on the Roman alphabet at all, which leads to less confusion and clearer features. You can read all about it at www.musa.bet. And here's a ...
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1 vote

Why was "zh" picked to represent /ʒ/, and where does it come from?

In english, the digraph "sh" represents the unvoiced palatal fricative, and the letter s represents the unvoiced alveolar fricative. The letter z is just a voiced alveolar fricative, so it ...
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