New answers tagged

2

The main practical consideration is how many things you have to add to your theoretical toolbox if you talk in terms of "coloring" versus being "syllabic". Suppose that you only had a single anomalous vowel-like thing to deal with, [ɚ]. That would be a bit suspicious, compared to other kinds of vowels, where you have multiple "close&...


2

Normally, the prevocalic consonant would be perceptually most prominent since the release from near-silence to vowel is dramatic, however any clip taken from a Beatles concert is not exactly normal. There is a fair amount of background noise and the foreground signal is highly mixed. Of course, we know the lyrics to the song so we can supply a transcription, ...


3

I like the answer given by user6726, but want to address some other issues. Generally, any kind of /e/ will be "halfway" between /a/ and /i/ as you divide the "vowel space" into three. To distinguish [ɛ] and [e], you generally have to divide the same space into four, so that [ɛ] will be noticeably closer in sound to /a/ and [e] will be ...


4

The only effective way to produce IPA sounds in a standard manner is to listen to and imitate expert productions. The IPA kindly provides a collection of such recordings, which you can get here. There are a number of knock-offs on the internet if you aren't interested in standard values. As you will notice, there are differences in the productions of the ...


Top 50 recent answers are included