5

It is questionable whether there is such a thing as "assimilation of manner" in the same sense that there is assimilation of place. Assimilation of place traditionally refers to wholesale shift in POA as represented in the IPA charts, to t → p, p → k and so on: columns of cells identify a "place". "Manner" cross-classifies rows ...


3

Affricated realization of /t/ is characteristic of (certain varieties of) London speech (Cockney). Wells (1982: 31) writes: A common allophone of /t/ in a London accent is a heavily affricated [ts], thus [tsɑɪʔ ~ tsɑɪts] tight, [ˈpʰɑːtsi] party. To an American ear, as mentioned above, this evokes the stereotype of effeminacy, if the speaker is a man; but in ...


3

The notion of a "phonetic consonant" as distinct from a "phonological consonant" is rather anomalous. "Consonant" is a kind of segment, as is "vowel", and all three terms (including "segment") are phonological concepts. Phoneticians don't define consonants, or vowels, they take those phonological units for ...


2

In good boy, /ɡʊb bɔɪ/, we see that the last consonant of good has become a /b/. In isolation the last consonant of good would be a /d/. If we give these two phonemes their Voice Place Manner labels, /d/ would be a ᴠᴏɪᴄᴇᴅ ᴅᴇɴᴛᴀʟ ᴘʟᴏsɪᴠᴇ and /b/ would be a ᴠᴏɪᴄᴇᴅ ʙɪʟᴀʙɪᴀʟ ᴘʟᴏsɪᴠᴇ. So we can see that whilst the last consonant of good is still voiced and still ...


1

If you allow for clusters across syllable boundaries, English could be an example what hand = /wɒt.hænd/ what and = /wɒtʰ.ænd/


1

It has been proposed that this contrast (aspiration vs. cluster consonant + [h]) does not exist (Kehrein & Golston 2004). The formal explanation is that aspiration is a property of the onset, not of individual segments. So, in an onset aspiration can occur once and it may be realized on the stop or as an [h] (or variably as both), but a contrast is not ...


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