6 votes

Difference between voiced and lenis consonants in English

The terms reflect personal terminological preferences regarding certain consonants in English. "Voiced" usually refers to a physical property, that the vocal folds are vibrating during the ...
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4 votes
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Why do many languages analyse [e̞] as /ɛ/?

I don't know of any evidence that the Swedish, Dutch, Norwegian or Icelandic languages analyze any vowels as [ɛ] or [e̞], and I don't know what it would mean for a language to analyze a vowel as /ɛ/ ...
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4 votes

Why are English diphthongs not analysed as a vowel and a glide?

There are certainly authors that analyze English diphthongs as vowel + glide, but as far as I understand the primary reason they are widely analyzed as distinct phonemes is that /j, w/ are otherwise ...
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3 votes
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What has happened to the World Phonotactics Database?

I've checked with the maintainers. They tell me there is currently no official version of the phonotactics database online. However, they are still actively expanding it and there are plans to build a ...
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2 votes

Violations of sonority sequencing principle in English

It is generally understood that the sonority-related generalizations about English are only valid within a root-like domain and not the fully-inflected word (/-z, -d/ give rise to substantial ...
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2 votes

Why are English diphthongs not analysed as a vowel and a glide?

The Sound Pattern of English, Chomsky & Halle (1968), treats diphthongs as sequences of vowel plus glide. One reason for this treatment is that there is a difference between [əɪ] and e.g. [ey], ...
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