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An alternative to the "language keyboard" approach is the compose-key approach, exemplified by the inexpensive program "Accent Composer" (which I have used for decades), and also available in a number of open source versions for Windows, listed here. Accent Composer and AllChars use a "hotkey" (I don't know the other 3, I assume ...


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We are looking for a language that has phonologically significant tones, and released stops in syllable-final position. Look no further than (Classical) Greek. A word like ἐκτός “outside” is phonologically /ektós/ (the accent indicates that the 2nd syllable has the high tone), with no indication that the /k/ at the end of the first syllable was not released.


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Tibetan (at least most dialects) is normally considered tonal, and has at least a labial stop that's usually released in the syllable-final position. Depending on dialect and how the speaker is trying to distinctly enunciate, there may be released velar and possibly alveolar stops in the syllable-final position too. These more commonly become a(n unreleased) ...


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Outside the more ‘traditional’ areas of tonal languages, Swedish and Norwegian both have tones (albeit employed to a lesser degree than stereotypically tonal languages, being only distinguished in stressed syllables) and, being Germanic languages, generally release their syllable-final consonants. An example would be the Swedish minimal pair brynet ‘the edge ...


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Punjabi is normally analysed as being tonal. They're rare, but syllable-final released stops may be found in words like /hʊkuːmət/ which I'm given to understand means "the secondmost" or something. Also consider Lakhota, which has phonemic tone and has a word /jatkə̃õna/ ("they drank it and..."). I'm assuming the syllable break occurs ...


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In theory, the IPA symbol ɲ is a palatal nasal stop, which means there's a complete closure blocking airflow through the mouth (near the palate), and all the airflow is exclusively through the nose. j̃ on the other hand is a nasalized palatal approximant, meaning there's no complete closure, so there is some airflow through the mouth as well as the nose. In ...


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Labiovelars like /kʷ/ (that is, the Latin qu- sound) and /ɡʷ/ have turned into labial stops in at least some environments in a few different languages (almost exclusively in European Indo-European languages); it happened in Greek after the Mycenaean period (compare e.g. the verb ἕπομαι hépomai 'to follow' with its Latin cognate sequor, both reflecting the ...


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The change of /kʷ/ > /p/ is moderately common, cross-linguistically. It also happened in Osco-Umbrian aka "P-Italic" (Oscan pis ~ Latin quis "who"), the "P-Celtic" languages (Welsh pen < *kʷennom "head"), and most dialects of Greek (Attic hippos ~ Mycenaean i-qo "horse"). The usual explanation is that /...


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User6726 explained why this sound change happened, but I'd like to explain more concisely what happened. In the history of Latin, PIE *dʰ within a word usually became d, but instead became b next to r or u, and before l. This probably happened somewhere between Proto-Italic and Latin, where the outcome of word-internal *dʰ is usually reconstructed as *ð (...


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The "name" for the rule is labialization, though unlike names like Grimm's Law, Meinhof's Law and Osthoff's Law, it refers to a class of similar phenomena (likewise palatalization, lenition, vowel harmony). Typically, linguists are more interested in why a certain thing happened, though in some schools of linguistics you don't ask why, you just ask ...


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I don't understand what you are actually asking, but I suppose it has to do with how people pronounce the guy's name. What is the "archaising" pronunciation that you're talking about? If you go from spelling, you are probably going to pronounce it with your native language's rhotic (assuming there is only one), because of the letter r (z is ignored,...


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The question that exists in phonological theory regarding syllables, moras and so forth is, what is the required collection of suprasegmental units required to describe human language phonological grammars. Practically speaking, this means, "do we need all of the set {skeletal position, mora, onset, rhyme, nucleus, coda, margin, syllable}?" The ...


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