New answers tagged

3 votes
Accepted

How commonly are [u] and cardinal close-mid [o] allophones?

Cardinal IPA vowels and Finnish The first of the two somewhat distinct questions asked here hinges, I think, on the quality of the recordings provided, the speakers’ ability to produce cardinal IPA ...
Janus Bahs Jacquet's user avatar
0 votes

What was the original pronounciation of the Thai consonant symbols?

have you found any answers to question 2 (about ฎ)? I was thinking about something similar but kind of doubt the existence of retroflex stops in (Old) Thai, because these phonemes do not seem to have ...
ziyang's user avatar
  • 1
2 votes

Schwa vowel in indonesian

The Indonesian language has six vowel phonemes, /i/, /u/, /e/, /ə/, /o/, /a/, but only five vowel letters, <a>, <e>, <i>, <o>, <u>, the letter <e> stands for both /...
Yellow Sky's user avatar
  • 18.3k
0 votes

Schwa vowel in indonesian

The sources I'm reading all say there are six vowels including schwa. For example: https://www.jstor.org/stable/27863619
Someone211's user avatar
3 votes

Is it possible for two words to have the same underlying representation but different surface forms?

Yes it is possible (with a major caveat). As an example, consider English an & Anne. In this instance, the two typically occur in distinct prosodic environments (as a proper noun, Anne typically ...
Tristan's user avatar
  • 8,322
0 votes

Types of Sound Variations (Like Accents and Tones) in Languages

idk if someone has mentioned but in Filipino, we have pitch accent and vowel timing. Which from the top of my head I think can make a word have 3 meanings is the most I remember. Most of the words ...
AdventureCJ's user avatar
0 votes

Lip rounding doesn't transform the close-mid back vowels into each other, so why is the only difference between their names roundedness?

They are called that because that is how they are defined. If the vowels feel different when you pronounce them, and sound different when you hear them, it is either because the vowels in question are ...
Tristan's user avatar
  • 8,322
5 votes

Is it not true that large phoneme inventories allow more syllables?

There's a similar problem with consonants. Oddly, I have issues pronouncing the voiced fricatives in certain environments. Such phones are rare, and in languages that have them like English they're ...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 66.2k
7 votes
Accepted

Origin of Singapore Cantonese /œː/ being realised as [jɔ]

香, 兩, 想 all belong to the 陽 final in Middle Chinese, which is reconstructed as having (Baxter) jang / (Wang Li) /ĭaŋ/. This final regularly became /œːŋ/ in the 廣府 Guangfu region, as we hear across the ...
Michaelyus's user avatar
  • 7,466

Top 50 recent answers are included