New answers tagged

1

The notion of a "phonetic consonant" as distinct from a "phonological consonant" is rather anomalous. "Consonant" is a kind of segment, as is "vowel", and all three terms (including "segment") are phonological concepts. Phoneticians don't define consonants, or vowels, they take those phonological units for ...


1

In a comment, Janus Bahs Jacquet wrote: Your vocal cords usually close when they’re not in use (to close off access to your windpipe and prevent things getting into your throat). Pronouncing a vowel without a glottal stop requires first opening the cords, then starting the vowel; with a glottal stop, you basically open the cords by pushing the air needed to ...


2

In good boy, /ɡʊb bɔɪ/, we see that the last consonant of good has become a /b/. In isolation the last consonant of good would be a /d/. If we give these two phonemes their Voice Place Manner labels, /d/ would be a ᴠᴏɪᴄᴇᴅ ᴅᴇɴᴛᴀʟ ᴘʟᴏsɪᴠᴇ and /b/ would be a ᴠᴏɪᴄᴇᴅ ʙɪʟᴀʙɪᴀʟ ᴘʟᴏsɪᴠᴇ. So we can see that whilst the last consonant of good is still voiced and still ...


5

It is questionable whether there is such a thing as "assimilation of manner" in the same sense that there is assimilation of place. Assimilation of place traditionally refers to wholesale shift in POA as represented in the IPA charts, to t → p, p → k and so on: columns of cells identify a "place". "Manner" cross-classifies rows ...


0

See Colin Fine's answer for the Spanish story. There exist some similar consonant-vowel pairs in West Germanic: Standard German l : Austro-Bavarian ɪ /fal/ : /foɪ/ ("fall" means fall) /fɔl/ : /fuɪ/ ("voll" = full) /fyl/ : /fyɪ/ ("füll" = fill) /va:l/ : /vɔ:ɪ/ ("wahl" = choice) /vo:l/ : /vo:ɪ/ ("wohl" = well) ....


8

Syllable-initial Latin "Xl" clusters, where X is a consonant, regularly become "Xi" in Italian. Examples: platea -> piazza ('square') clamare -> chiamare ('call') flumen -> fiume ('river') glacia -> ghiaccio ('ice') blancus -> bianco ('white') As you surmise, these went through a stage of /ʎ/ (like Spanish <ll>)...


0

Its ironic that people think the |x| sound in Spanish is Arabic influence when it is precisely this sound which makes it so difficult to recognize the Arabic influence in Spanish lexicon. The |x| sound comes from what Spanish speakers refer to as the readjustment of the sibilants which occurred over a rather short period shortly after the conquest of Mexico. ...


3

I'll come back to this in 25 years to see if I have a different view, but as far as I can tell there are no properties of particular language phoneme selection that make a language senior-friendly vs. senior-unfriendly. There are some "whole language" properties that are challenging, viz. languages where by convention you talk fast, or quietly, but ...


Top 50 recent answers are included