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8 votes
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What kind of phrase is "until recently"?

Your 'rules' mix traditional and contemporary grammars. It's true in both traditional and contemporary grammars that a preposition phrase [PP] consists of a preposition and an object; but in ...
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7 votes

Why do so many languages have a phase like "so-so"?

Is there a common origin? No. Is there some theory to explain this? I propose one: common need. In Is “Huh?” a Universal Word? Conversational Infrastructure and the Convergent Evolution of ...
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6 votes
Accepted

Is the adverbial phrase and adverb phrase identical?

Short answer An adverb phrase is best thought of as a phrase headed by an adverb, in the same way that a preposition phrase is a phrase headed by a preposition and so forth. An 'Adverbial' is a ...
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6 votes

Is the adverbial phrase and adverb phrase identical?

I very much dislike the term "adverbial". I think it is very unsatisfactory to have a function term that is morphologically derived from a category term. Adverb is a word category, and adverb phrase (...
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  • 780
5 votes
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Is there an objective definition of compound words?

I agree that the English spelling of compounds is to a large degree arbitrary, but I also think there is an objectifiable distinction between compounds and phrases, at least in Indo-European languages....
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4 votes

What part of speech is "as their native"?

The number of people who speak English as their native language will decline. The string as their native comprises three separate items: the preposition "as", the genitive pronoun "their" and the ...
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  • 41
4 votes
Accepted

How to treat adverbial phrases in X-bar theory

Short answer '[I]n the many places where I was guilty of the reprehensible and shockingly common confusion of the notions of "adverb" and "adverbial"; these defects, for which I ...
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3 votes

What is the term for the formation of word groups with single meaning/function (e.g. "in relation to which") in lingustics

The term for such kind of phrase is multiword expression. I am not aware of a special term for the process that creates multiword expression. I am also not aware of some special treatment of them; in ...
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3 votes

The function of prepositional phrases

You're asking about both constituency and dependency. Constituency: Is "peek into" a phrasal verb or verb+preposition? So do we have [[peeking into][the alley]] or [peeking[into[the alley]]]? You ...
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  • 263
3 votes

Phrases and clauses used as an adverb, and hence don't take a preposition

The answer to this question has (again) to do with the argument vs. adjunct distinction. Often the term complement is used in place of argument, although the argument notion is more clearly defined. ...
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2 votes

The function of prepositional phrases

to peek - into the alley to look - into the mirror to go - into the house to fall - into the pit Such structures are verb + preposition group (a where-to indication). If you analyze the structure ...
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  • 448
2 votes

"Have in view" - origin

Modern Greek has "have under view = to be aware of", έχω υπ' όψιν and "take under view = to consider", λαμβάνω υπ' όψιν; the morphology is Ancient. The phrase is classic Puristic, but it appears to be ...
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2 votes

What part of speech is "as their native"?

As @user6726 already said, you can not assign the phrase a POS, because "part of speech" refers to single words which as their native language isn't. If you are interested in the syntactic category, ...
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2 votes
Accepted

Which word is the head of the phrase "somewhere there"?

Somewhere there is a crime happening. In the sentence above from the Robocop films the word somewhere is functioning as a Locative Adjunct. Notice that it can appear either at the beginning or end of ...
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2 votes

Infinitive clauses referring to an adjective before a noun

(the question should be on ELU or ELL) In the first group (both sides), the infinitive action is done by the subject. In the second group (right side), the infinitive action is done by the main ...
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  • 646
2 votes

How to extract meaning of colloquial phrases and expressions in English

This is very difficult. I'll recommend three things: Use the U of I CogComp shallow parser to get phrases (not CoreNLP), see: http://nlp.cogcomp.org/ It's much better at picking up phrases, IMO. If ...
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2 votes

Does each word category have a corresponding phrase category?

Assuming that syntactic analysis is more interested in functional rather than lexical aspects, it would be not implausible that in general, certain POS categories can be subsumed under one syntactic ...
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  • 6,120
1 vote

Analysis of adverbial phrases composed of NOUN and NOUN

I'm going to answer your questions in reverse order. Is it a completely idiomatic structure, or is there some way to connect it to more regular grammar? While these individual examples are idioms, ...
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1 vote

Detect egoistical emotion

I don't think there is such a thing as "egoistical emotion" that can be detected. A huge part of the problem here is confusion between "egoistical" and "egotistical". All of your existing examples ...
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  • 2,585
1 vote

Is "bien décidés" an adjectival phrase?

The phrase "bien décidés" qualifies "quelques volontaires", which is a noun phrase, as its head is the noun "volontaires". A phrase that qualifies a noun phrase would typically be an adjectival ...
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  • 1,696
1 vote

Is "bien décidés" an adjectival phrase?

They are separate words belonging to different syntactic classes. "bien" is an adverb here that determines the adjective "décidés". "bien" can be substituted for another adverb as "très". "bien" can ...
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  • 1,467
1 vote

Metalanguage to describe expressing an idea in many different ways

They are different 'linguistic forms' pointing to the same referent, so the term 'periphrases' (generated through grammatical transformations) seems the correct one. Instead, Frege used the term '...
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1 vote

Which word is the head of the phrase "somewhere there"?

Edit: As Araucaria pointed out, OP (and consequently I) misinterpreted the sentence for Somwhere there a crime is happening/Somehwere there, there is a crime happening, which, however, is not what the ...
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  • 6,120
1 vote

Does each word category have a corresponding phrase category?

I question whether the premise of your question is true about language structure, though it is surely true about the way some people talk about language. Why think there is any difference between ...
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  • 12.3k
1 vote

What part of speech is "as their native"?

In the example "The number of people who speak English as their native language will decline", "as their native language" is a manner adverb, which makes it a V-bar modifier, following the analysis in ...
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  • 12.3k
1 vote

Having trouble with assigning stress degrees to a long compound

At first sight, an analysis as a (binary composed) compound seems to be possible: You could start arguing about the precise labels; for reason of simplicity I just assumed that the suffix "-ed" makes ...
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  • 6,120
1 vote

Is there a phrase for someone being ashamed of, or self-conscious about their accent when moving to another region?

I've heard this referred to as 'linguistic insecurity'. This is neither '3-4 words', nor specifically incorporates the 'move to another region' aspect you mention, but people often talk about '...
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1 vote

singular part of speech for multi-word units and expressions?

I find the question and much of the discussion so far contaminated by confusions between language and writing and between word and phrase. "Frying pan" is a noun; it is a compound, made up of two ...
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