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9 votes
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Which language is the closest lexically to Spanish?

The map you have doesn't pass the sniff test for me. I don't imagine anyone realistically saying Catalonian being closer to Spanish than Galician. I can't speak for other Romance groups, but for ...
user0721090601's user avatar
7 votes
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Where did the nasal sound in the Portuguese word "sim" come from?

In the late sixteenth century, there was a sporadic sound change in Portuguese which caused some stressed, word-final /i/s to become nasalised. Examples: sim, marfim, assim, metim, morim. An older ...
J. Siebeneichler's user avatar
6 votes
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Why is the future tense almost completely regular in Portuguese?

Most of the "tenses" of the modern Romance languages are inherited directly from Latin, and so have had plenty of time to accumulate irregularities (and indeed many existed even within Latin)...
Tristan's user avatar
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6 votes
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History and Reason of Portuguese accentuation marks

It is true that the earliest fragments of Galician-Portuguese have no stress marking, although they already make use of other diacritics such as the tilde and the cedilla. The first Portuguese grammar,...
Michaelyus's user avatar
  • 7,476
6 votes
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Portuguese — Why use definite articles in front of possessive nouns? Why the extensive use of proposition contraction?

It is not so uncommon for langueges to put articles in front of personal names, it happens, for instance, in the South Tyrol dialect of German, so it is just a thing that happened and it is one of the ...
Ergative Man's user avatar
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5 votes
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Do all colonized countries use formal second pronouns person in daily life?

Québec, which originated as a French colony in North America, offers a very clear counterexample: it is well-known that speakers of Québécois French use tu in many more situations and much more ...
Hunter's user avatar
  • 166
5 votes

Use of the definite article in European vs. Brazilian Portuguese

The rule is different. It only applies when the possessive pronoun is substantive: Este é meu livro, o seu é o outro. (This is my book, yours is the other one.) In most other contexts, the use of ...
Luís Henrique's user avatar
4 votes
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Why do I hear the p, t, k in Portuguese as aspirated plosives?

There are two aspects to this: the greater aspiration of /p, t, k/ in Portuguese than in Spanish. the greater lenition of /b, d, g/ in Spanish than in Portuguese. From one 2008 study of 35 South and ...
Michaelyus's user avatar
  • 7,476
4 votes

Use of the definite article in European vs. Brazilian Portuguese

Not a complete answer, but to the question on variations in different standards and dialects: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brazilian_Portuguese#Definite_article_before_possessive The Portuguese ...
Adam Bittlingmayer's user avatar
3 votes

Did the Portuguese influence how days of the week are named in Vietnamese and Chinese?

This is a summary of the information on CJV Lang, which has a much more detailed view on the naming of the 7-day week across many languages. But in essence: Neither dynastic China nor Vietnam had a ...
Michaelyus's user avatar
  • 7,476
3 votes

Portuguese: Inconsistencies in use of second person pronouns and conjugation

I think it may be not a definitive answer for your question, but I hope it will clarify and explain a few things. Well, until the XV century, tu (from latin TV) and vós (from latin VOS) were ...
Ergative Man's user avatar
  • 1,446
3 votes

Why do I speak more accurately in English rather than my native language?

There are fast and slow languages, measured in syllables per second. I don't know about Portuguese, but Spanish is a fast language while English is a slow language. There is a correlation between the ...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
2 votes

What is closer to 16th century Portuguese, Brazilian Portuguese or Portuguese from Portugal?

As you have mentioned sound, let us restrict the discussion to Portuguese phonology, and simply go through some features by area. Most of this gleaned from bits and pieces across several sources, so I ...
Michaelyus's user avatar
  • 7,476
2 votes
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How did "li" come to mean "here" in Cape Verdean Creole?

I'm not familiar with these languages, so I can't give a complete answer to your question. I just wanted to point out that "opposites" is a pretty strong term for two words with such similar meanings ...
brass tacks's user avatar
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2 votes

Conjugation stem changes in Portuguese

In Spanish, it is very usual that we find that we have to change e ⟶ i, o ⟶ ue, etc. When we conjugate, however, Portuguese does not have it, except in some cases. Why is that? Ergative Man has ...
Draconis's user avatar
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2 votes
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Conjugation stem changes in Portuguese

In short, it depends on the different phonological processes each language had in its history and the regularizations that may or may not have happened in their words and paradigms. The past tense of ...
Ergative Man's user avatar
  • 1,446
2 votes
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Why does the Portuguese language sound similar to French language to me?

The nasal vowels, like the other replies said, are probably why. The pronouns are also similar. Je, Tu, Il/Elle/On, Nous, Vous, Ils/Elles for French and Eu, Tu, Ele/Ela, Nós, Eles,Elas.
nai's user avatar
  • 71
2 votes

History and Reason of Portuguese accentuation marks

The accentuation system in the orthography of Portuguese was created to be logic, so that every word shows where the stressed syllable is in the most economic way, making only a relatively small ...
Ergative Man's user avatar
  • 1,446
2 votes

Why does "s" in Portuguese sound like /z/ between vowels?

This is very common among languages, voiceless sounds (such as [s]) tend to become voiced between other voiced sounds such as voiced consonants and vowels. And that is it what happened historically in ...
Ergative Man's user avatar
  • 1,446
1 vote
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Why does "s" in Portuguese sound like /z/ between vowels?

In trying to understand the connection between letters and pronunciation, one should always look at the history of the language, which means "looking" at the pre-modern form of the various ...
user6726's user avatar
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