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4 votes
Accepted

Why not use a Lookup taggers?

Simply put, they're just not as good. Lookup taggers can't deal with the fact that words can have multiple parts of speech: look at "project" in English, which can be a verb or a noun. A lookup tagger ...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 67.8k
4 votes
Accepted

What does 'MSP' stand for in the context of Chinese parts of speech?

I emailed Fei Xia and she said that MSP simply means miscallenous particles. I don't think it actually means anything more special, like "modal structural particle," or otherwise. Page 17 of the ...
tsainez's user avatar
  • 314
4 votes

Why is 's a verb?

Because "that's" can always be replaced by "that is". When 's is not a possessive, it is a shortened version of "is" or "has" (or, in rapid speech after what and when, "does").
Colin Fine's user avatar
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3 votes
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What exactly is meant by "part of speech" (POS) in linguistics and NLP?

One purpose of parts-of-speech is to simplify grammatical descriptions. They group together words that behave in a similar way, and their behaviours can then be more easily described in rules. They ...
Oliver Mason's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Why is 's a verb?

Are these two sentences the same to you? It's fine. It is fine. If so, then I would claim that they are synonymous because 's is written shorthand for is. Is is the verb to be in English.
possiblyLethal's user avatar
3 votes

How to tag_pos in nltk for a language that is not English?

Chapter 5 of the online NLTK book explains the concepts and procedures you would use to create a tagged corpus. There are several taggers which can use a tagged corpus to build a tagger for a new ...
tripleee's user avatar
  • 716
2 votes

Which is the most recommended corpus for training a POS Tagger?

Whichever corpus is reasonably large and correctly annotated and has similar content to what the tagger will actually be used on. (Maybe you can be more specific about what you need.) Realistically ...
Adam Bittlingmayer's user avatar
2 votes

C++ library for part-of-speech tagging in English

MIT licensed POS tagger for English that uses mlpack (C++, BSD-licensed lib): https://github.com/kiner-shah/mlpack_examples/tree/main/example_hidden_markov_model
Franck Dernoncourt's user avatar
1 vote

What exactly is meant by "part of speech" (POS) in linguistics and NLP?

"Part of speech" is only marginally recognized in theoretical linguistics, instead linguists deal in features, and then perhaps offer informal recognitions of traditional parts of speech in ...
user6726's user avatar
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1 vote

Possessive vs non possesive WH-pronouns

You are right. There only 'whose' is possessive: The tag for WHOSE is WPRO$. he_PRO asked_VBD hir_PRO ... whos_WPRO$ was_BED the_D child_N within_P her_PRO$ body_N and_CONJ by_P whoos_WPRO$ ...
T1nts's user avatar
  • 446
1 vote

Why are prepositions and subordinate conjunctions grouped as the same tag in the Penn Treebank tag set?

Look up here: Complements of P PPs are headed by prepositions and take complements of various categories. The most common are NP and CP, but ADJP, ADVP, IP, PP, etc. are possible as well. Since ...
T1nts's user avatar
  • 446
1 vote

How can you know that a word in a sentence is a verb?

In a word, if you don't know, you have to guess, then try to verify your guess. You will probably use some heuristics (that is, rules of thumb) to guide your guesswork. At least, as a linguist, that'...
Greg Lee's user avatar
  • 12.5k
1 vote

How can you know that a word in a sentence is a verb?

Yes, with probabilistic parsing and part-of-speech tagging. See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parsing#Human_languages https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Part-of-speech_tagging https://en.wikipedia.org/...
Adam Bittlingmayer's user avatar
1 vote
Accepted

Why does the CLAWS5 tagset separate "of" from all other prepositions?

The function word "of" is sometimes difficult to classify, think of cases like to be aware of something, to be fond of something/someone, or because of. Putting it in a category of its own reduces the ...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar

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