4 votes

Any other example of "socially stigmatized phoneme" like the "th" sound in some Venetian dialect?

In any place where regional origin is associated with lower social status (basically, where internal migration in search of jobs and wages is/was important, or where a central political authority was ...
Luís Henrique's user avatar
3 votes

Any other example of "socially stigmatized phoneme" like the "th" sound in some Venetian dialect?

In Hindi the usage of only /s/ in the place of /ʃ/ /ʂ/ and /s/ generally makes one sound less educated. Same with the realization of the monophthongs /ɛː/ and /ɔː/ as diphthongs /əɪ/ and /əʊ/. These ...
Aryaman's user avatar
  • 1,134
2 votes

What determines how a language creates new words? For example, is it likely for English to continue to create new words from Latin in future?

As I'm sure you know, there are many ways to create neologisms. (Here are a few I summarized in a student paper as a bright-eyed, bushy-tailed undergrad.) It would be fair to speculate that borrowings ...
Luke Sawczak's user avatar
  • 2,442
2 votes

Any other example of "socially stigmatized phoneme" like the "th" sound in some Venetian dialect?

You'd be better off asking what languages don't have such a feature. An example from New York City English is the curl-coil merger, which pronounces curl/coil, verse/voice, loin/learn as homophones. ...
ubadub's user avatar
  • 626
1 vote

Any other example of "socially stigmatized phoneme" like the "th" sound in some Venetian dialect?

I imagine this happens to some extent in all languages with a prestige dialect and non-prestige dialects with distinctive realisations of phonemes. Some examples that come to mind: ceceo in ...
iacobo's user avatar
  • 3,112

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