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8 votes
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How did ⟨x⟩ become /ʃ/ in Iberian Romance?

In order to answer your question, I am going to assume that you are asking about the historical development of Lat. ⟨x⟩ /ks/ > Ibero-Romance /ʃ/, and not about the orthography. As Colin Fine has ...
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3 votes

How did ⟨x⟩ become /ʃ/ in Iberian Romance?

Despite the Latin precedent, the letter x was more-originally pronounced [x] in eastern Greek (not the dialect source for the Etruscan alphabet), and the name of the corresponding Greek letter (χ) is [...
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10 votes

Pronunciation of D sound in British English

In the examples you cite, there is no [d] in most dialects of American English, it is replaced with the flap [ɾ]. Thus "writer" and "rider" are phonetically identical, though given ...
  • 70k
11 votes

Pronunciation of D sound in British English

American English speakers tend to reduce /d/ to a flapped [ɾ] between vowels, while British English speakers generally don't. This means an RP /d/ can sound a lot "stronger" than an American ...
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