10 votes
Accepted

Why is the question mark like this in Hebrew language?

This is likely to be an unsatisfying answer, but… Historical accident. That's just the way it is. Hebrew imported various punctuation marks from various other languages of Europe fairly early, and ...
  • 53.9k
5 votes

Why isn't this sentence in a passive form?

There's a common feature in English known as the "ergative construction", "middle construction", or "labile construction", though it's not quite the same as an actual ergative case (as found in Basque)...
  • 53.9k
3 votes
Accepted

Does grammar allow two questions in one sentence?

Since you're asking on Linguistics SE, I assume you're asking a linguistic question, and not e.g. a writing style question. So such constructions are reasonably common in English, to the point that ...
  • 70k
2 votes

"Is there ...?" vs "Does ... have ...?" Yes/No questions

I don't see the relevance of questions. There are declarative counterparts to all of your examples that are questions. The oddity of your example "Does Restaurant X have many people?" is duplicated ...
  • 12.2k
2 votes
Accepted

"Is there ...?" vs "Does ... have ...?" Yes/No questions

I think it's a mistake to try to understand these structures based on paraphrase relations in questions, and you'll make more headway in whatever you're ultimately after if you look at the declarative ...
  • 70k
2 votes

Do there exist any languages that use inflection to create questions?

Standard Korean has an interrogative inflection (as opposed to declarative, imperative and propositive moods), as part of the property known as the "pragmatic mood". It is characterised by -ㅂ니까 -...
  • 5,553
2 votes

Do there exist any languages that use inflection to create questions?

Yes there are other ways of constructing questions. Many Australian languages use a verbal auxiliary which carries some modal meaning, to which they then attach subject and object agreement clitics. ...
  • 5,444
2 votes
Accepted

Question type corpus

I found this dataset, which is quite good, but I think it has to be more on the internet. http://cogcomp.cs.illinois.edu/Data/QA/QC/
2 votes

Is either of these meanings of the word "sentence" more conventional?

I think we can confidently conclude that there are two or even more conflicting definitions of "sentence". Analogously, there are multiple definitions of "markedness". However, your first quote: ...
  • 70k
2 votes

Why isn't this sentence in a passive form?

The word "sells" here in the English language of today has a different meaning from "is sold", and Draconis' answer does not apply here (even if it may have historically ...
  • 182
1 vote

Word stress and sentence stress questions

English stress is analyzed extensively in The sound pattern of English, and a number of rules are required to generate the patterns which they observe (a system of numeric stress degrees). “Stress” is ...
  • 70k
1 vote

Word stress and sentence stress questions

As far as I am aware, English has phonemic stress on at least three levels: word stress, compound stress, and sentence stress. In all three cases, the stress manifests as a differentiated syllable or ...
1 vote

What is the linguistical terminology for (and if) letters of a given alphabet have(ing) their inherent meaning?

As user6726 mentions, acrophony (and the related rebus principle) appear commonly when developing writing systems in the first place. If the word for "mouth" is pronounced /ka/, then people ...
  • 53.9k
1 vote

What do you call a question to convey curiosity, without expecting a direct answer

Thinking out loud, aloud!?) There no term for yours definition, because 'rhetorical question' fit it at all. But it must be something like 'no-seek-information question' if you want, or something ...
  • 461
1 vote

Is either of these meanings of the word "sentence" more conventional?

How to find out what category an expression is in? How to decide? When to worry about it? Who to ask? When to accept a proposed answer? Since expressions of the same category can be coordinated, ...
  • 12.2k
1 vote
Accepted

Why is it that the wh-word as a subject in the spec position cannot raise over an auxiliary verb like 'did'?

First of all, it is not the case that "who" cannot raise over "did" in T (or more precisely - over the tense affix), because it does so when moving from Spec-VP to Spec-TP anyway (under the VP-...
1 vote

Opposite of "intensifier"?

Mitigator: Mitigate v. make less severe, serious, or painful: he wanted to mitigate misery in the world. • lessen the gravity of (an offense or mistake): (as adj. mitigating) : he would have faced a ...

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