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3 votes

Is 'raising' an outdated concept in modern linguistics?

No, Raising is alive and well, but the conception of Raising as a transformation is moribund, because transformations are no longer accepted. So, if we believe in Raising, and Raising is a ...
Greg Lee's user avatar
  • 12.5k
2 votes

Raised object vs. Subordinate subject (I didn't want 'Kim' mistreating my cat)

Yes, Kim is a raised object in (2). But it's not in (1) or (3). They all come from similar structures, a main clause I didn't want NP, where the NP is a complement clause with Kim as subject and ...
jlawler's user avatar
  • 10.1k
1 vote

A fundamental question about 'subject-to subject raising'

The part in bold from the Oxford Dictionary of the English Language is, in my view, more right than wrong. It is more right than wrong because it can be demonstrated beyond a doubt that the embedded ...
Tim Osborne's user avatar
  • 5,757
1 vote

Raised object vs. Subordinate subject (I didn't want 'Kim' mistreating my cat)

Yes - syntactically, 'Kim' is raised to object. A pronoun there (such as 'him') would be in object form. 'Kim' is the subject of the embedded clause, but that clause is the direct object of 'want', ...
amI's user avatar
  • 666
1 vote

Can a control verb simultaneously be a raising verb?

Well, not simultaneously, no. Not in the same sentence. But as these exercises makes clear, it can happen that a particular English verb, like want, governs Equi (aka "Equivalent Noun Phrase ...
jlawler's user avatar
  • 10.1k

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