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25 votes
Accepted

Replacing Chinese characters with pinyin forever as Vietnamese did

Yes, it is possible to read texts that are written only in pinyin. This is pretty trivial in one sense: pinyin spelling indicates all of the segmental phonemic distinctions of standard Putonghua ...
brass tacks's user avatar
  • 18.3k
13 votes

Replacing Chinese characters with pinyin forever as Vietnamese did

It is possible only if you write in an informal way – the way you would say things out loud. The difference between formal and informal writing is quite large in Chinese, and the informal style may ...
michau's user avatar
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9 votes

Replacing Chinese characters with pinyin forever as Vietnamese did

You have had some good answers to your question, but I would like to expand on what you say about Vietnamese writing traditions. The Chinese-based chữ nôm had a very marginal existence in Vietnam, ...
fdb's user avatar
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8 votes

Replacing Chinese characters with pinyin forever as Vietnamese did

Beyond other answers, I will add some examples of actual use of phonetic writing systems actually used for Chinese (or any Sinitic language, what is traditionally called Chinese dialects/topolects). ...
Frédéric Grosshans's user avatar
5 votes

Academically reliable calculator of Gunning Fog Index

The website clearly does not fulfill the requirements of Reproducible Research. The algorithm is not Open Source and the implementation isn't available for inspection. There are more problems: The ...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
5 votes

To what extent can Japanese Kana be adapted to the Spanish language and be intelligible?

The phonology of Spanish might be vaguely similar to that of Japanese but the differences are also relevant. There are many consonantal clusters in Spanish and also word final consonants, and this ...
Artemij Keidan's user avatar
4 votes

Replacing Chinese characters with pinyin forever as Vietnamese did

The idea of pinyin or any other phonetic script replacing Chinese character writing is already more than a hundred years old. At the beginning of 20th century, when the Qing empire was collapsing, a ...
kash's user avatar
  • 145
4 votes

Replacing Chinese characters with pinyin forever as Vietnamese did

It would be possible to use pinyin even without the tone marks to write down Chinese and it will be correctly understood. Actually, a similar thing has been done in the Dungan language for decades ...
Yellow Sky's user avatar
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4 votes

Does capitalizing nouns improve readability?

I haven't read any empirical studies myself, but Wikipedia refers to three resources that seem to support this claim, so you might want to consult those studies if you are interested in the details. ...
Natalie Clarius's user avatar
4 votes

Replacing Chinese characters with pinyin forever as Vietnamese did

Pinyin tosses out a lot of semantic information. Once Chinese characters are removed from the language, it becomes harder for Mandarin to coexist with different Chinese languages under the same ...
Kevin Li's user avatar
  • 331
1 vote

Are the characters in some writing systems more or less visually distinctive than in others?

The most confusing (lacking distinction among letters) writing system is the the oldest variety of the Arabic script, usually known as Rasm, 7th - 11th centuries AD. The modern Arabic script has 28 ...
Yellow Sky's user avatar
  • 18.5k
1 vote

To what extent can Japanese Kana be adapted to the Spanish language and be intelligible?

The main problem with a kana transcription of Spanish (let's call it KTS) is the complex syllable structure. KTS would have to be able to adequately render two types of syllables that cannot be found ...
pablodf76's user avatar
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