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Is there a common origin? No. Is there some theory to explain this? I propose one: common need. In Is “Huh?” a Universal Word? Conversational Infrastructure and the Convergent Evolution of Linguistic Items, Dingemanse et. al. have found that in 10 languages, (and less carefully studied, 30 languages) Huh? is universal, and that it is a word. ...the ...


5

As a general rule, any copying of a part of a morpheme is classified as a kind of reduplication, as long as the operation is not purely phonologically conditioned (total vowel harmony across laryngeals is not treated as reduplication). This is treated as partial reduplication with fixed segmentism; it is also known as rhyming reduplication (to indicate which ...


3

I don't understand the alternative question. But, Gricean maxims are not absolute rules about human language, they are defeasible assumptions about human social behavior which aid a person in getting from a grammar-based meaning to a probable actual communicative intention. The maxim of brevity does not say that the word "elephant" is somehow amiss because ...


3

The last surviving reduplicating verb in modern German is tun, past tense tat, past participle getan. It is cognate to English do, did, done which also shows traces of reduplication (but this is no longer obvious, because in English -ed is the standard past tense suffix, and did can be reanalysed as d-ed). German tat clearly shows reduplication, because ...


3

In Icelandic, there are four verbs that are descendants of reduplicating verbs: they're called the "-ri" verbs due to their characteristic past tense suffix that they share with no other verb. These are "snúa" (to turn), "núa" (to rub), "gróa" (to heal) and "róa" (to row). In Old Norse, the verb "sá" (to sow) used to be in this group but Icelandic changed it ...


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