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9 votes

In English, noun phrases within a relative clause cannot be further relativized, but this is allowed in some cases in Japanese

Iwasaki's formulation is unclear. What he means is that besides the one NP in a relative clause that is made into a relative pronoun (or ortherwise marked as being relativized), you cannot relativize ...
Greg Lee's user avatar
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6 votes
Accepted

Turkish: the -DIK participles and an information loss

Your observation is correct and you're not missing anything. The original case information is simply lost with -DIK (and -(y)EcEK) participles. So is most of the original tense information by the way: ...
cyco130's user avatar
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5 votes

Relative Clause Tree Diagram

It's hard to tell from your picture, because some of the lines are not really visible. But I'm pretty sure your confusion comes from the fact that your teacher is wrong, in multiple, fundamental ways: ...
abarnert's user avatar
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5 votes

When did the concept of constituent movement arise?

What is different between English on the one hand, and such ancient Indo-European languages as Latin, Greek and Sanskrit, is that the latter had a very free constituent order: not only the order of ...
Artemij Keidan's user avatar
3 votes

Can't find the features related to Rel-N

As for Nganasan, see A Grammar of Nganasan, 2018, BRILL, by Beáta Wagner-Nagy. In short, it says that the relative clauses are usually participial constructions, the adverbial clauses stick to the ...
Yellow Sky's user avatar
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3 votes

What is a 'double-headed relative clause'?

This description appears to be taken from Jeffrey Heath’s A Grammar of Jamsay, which starts section 14 Relativization of with this preamble: The basic relative clause pattern has an internal head NP (...
Janus Bahs Jacquet's user avatar
3 votes

Why in English can't two NPs in a relative clause be relativized?

Let's compare three theories of the CNPC "island" constraint: TG. Ross's description is phrased in terms of Transformational Grammar. In fact the original title of his dissertation, Contraints on ...
Greg Lee's user avatar
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3 votes

Which noun phrases within relative clauses can be [further relativized]?

Assuming that you refer to your recent related question, I'll elaborate some more on Greg Lee's answer (which I think already brings the main issue of the problem quite well to the point), hoping that ...
Natalie Clarius's user avatar
2 votes

When did the concept of constituent movement arise?

It seems that the Mashi Wentong (1898) discusses fronting. "The “normal” subject is always called qici , while the topic is called zhuci, as can be seen in the analysis of sentence (4), where Zhuanyu ...
Brett Reynolds's user avatar
2 votes

Turkish: the -DIK participles and an information loss

That's correct as stated in other answers. If you need to keep the tense information you can use a different structure: Gezdirmiş olduğum köpek uyuyor. Gitmiş olduğum köy güzel. These sentences ...
Burcu K's user avatar
  • 21
2 votes

"To whom" in pied-piped infinitive relative clauses

As pointed out by sumelic in the comments, my corpus is woefully incomplete, and I missed the important generalization. The preposition doesn't matter: "I already told you about the man to/with/about *...
abarnert's user avatar
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2 votes
Accepted

Are non-restrictive relative clauses adjuncts or modifiers?

I'll refer you to, first, @BillJ's comment above, which I agree with, then to McCawley's analysis in the The Syntactic Phenomena of English, which makes restrictive relative clauses modifiers of N' (N-...
Greg Lee's user avatar
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2 votes

How does case inflection work on the head noun in internally headed relative clauses?

Hittite puts the noun inside the relative clause, then puts a pronoun in the main clause. The case of this pronoun indicates the role of that noun in the main clause. ÌR.MEŠ=YA=wa=za ku-ēs dā-s nu=...
Draconis's user avatar
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2 votes

What ways can languages parse sub-clauses from the rest of a clause?

Japanese allows relative clauses: Generally each clause has NOUN1 PARTICLE1 NOUN2 PARTICLE2 NOUN3 PARTICLE3 ... VERB format. Subject is optional and can be skipped if it can be guessed from context (...
Arfrever's user avatar
  • 553
2 votes

What ways can languages parse sub-clauses from the rest of a clause?

Hittite marks the beginning of each clause, and doesn't allow any nesting: you have to chain them together instead of putting one inside another. For example, to say "send back my subjects that ...
Draconis's user avatar
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2 votes
Accepted

Analysis of relative pronouns in dependency grammar

There are at least four basic analyses of relative clauses that one encounters in the DG literature. These four analyses are illustrated with the next dependency trees/graphs of the noun phrase the ...
Tim Osborne's user avatar
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2 votes

What is the syntactic status of subordinate clauses such as "what can be..."?

The what clauses include the terms that you say they modify. In These words are what can be called weak determiners. the relative clause (with fused head) is what can be called weak determiners....
Colin Fine's user avatar
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2 votes

Does the relative clause (which suggests...) here function as an adjunct of the whole clause in front of it?

The high notes returned to his compositions towards the end of his life, [which suggests he was hearing the works that were taking shape in his imagination]. Yes, it is an adjunct, more ...
BillJ's user avatar
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2 votes

Does the relative clause (which suggests...) here function as an adjunct of the whole clause in front of it?

I think you're right, and iirc this is what McCawley argues in Syntactic Phenomena of English. The antecedent of "which" in the appositive relative clause is the S "The high notes ... his life". ...
Greg Lee's user avatar
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1 vote

How does case inflection work on the head noun in internally headed relative clauses?

I think the Wikipedia article on relative clauses has a fairly good summary of different types of relative clause. I will refer to some of its categorizations below, but use them differently. The ...
Vegawatcher's user avatar
1 vote

What is the position of 'that' in the relative clause of this sentence?

There is a difference between wh-relative clauses (1) and that-relative clauses (2). The first are formed by wh-movement, whilst the second are a result of a complementizer merged in the head of C: (...
Tsutsu's user avatar
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1 vote
Accepted

Compositional Semantics of relative clauses

This is a good start and your calculation works out, but the standard literature wouldn't agree on your suggestion that Tom destroyed is of type t. The crucial point is that that the moved-away ...
Natalie Clarius's user avatar
1 vote

Compositional Semantics of relative clauses

The view which emerged from Lauri Karttunen's classic paper "Migs and Pilots" is that a relative pronoun is coreferential with the NP relative clause construction it occurs in. See Pauline Jacobson. ...
Greg Lee's user avatar
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1 vote

What part of a non-restrictive relative clause corefers?

I agree that your example is a reduced non-restrictive relative clause. For evidence that appositives of this sort are reduced clauses, see McCawley's discussion of appositives. However, in the ...
Greg Lee's user avatar
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1 vote

Which languages have Subject-object agreement in relative clauses?

I would not call this object-agreement because (to my knowledge) it also holds for non-object relative clauses, such as adverbial relative clauses (but not for subject-relative clauses, as I'm sure ...
laszabine's user avatar

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