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The site Behind the Name collects sourced and reliable information on the etymology of names. Note that the site has two parts, an "official" database endorsed by the site owner, and a "contributed" database created by volunteer editors. The volunteer editors also strive for quality, but the contributed names are in general less ...


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The general answer is "no", but in specific cases the answer could be "yes". First I think you need to pin down what exactly you hope to do. The internet is now full of phonetic transcriptions of words from all sorts of languages. You might think that with some such book, you can reliably figure out from reading a phonetic transcription ...


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You can take a look at Yoad Winter's book Elements of Formal Semantics and also Elizabeth Coppock and Lucas Champollion's Invitation to Formal Semantics.


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The best is to get a dictionary of the language you are interested in, in the case of your example a dictionary of English. The dictionary needs to use IPA (not all of them do, my copy of Merriam-Webster uses a home grown phonetic transcription). It will have a section in the beginning explaining all the symbols used and giving examples of well-known words ...


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A new plain text simplified Chinese corpus CLUECorpus2020 was released this year; see the paper at the arXiv. It is extracted from Common Crawl between the dates of July to December 2019. The files are downloadable from links from their Github page (which lead to Google or Baidu cloud services). They include 新闻语料 (news corpus) 8GB, 社区互动-语料 (social ...


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Just a collection? I have one, here we go! The language is Ptolemaic Demotic Egyptian. The rightmost column is Coptic, that's the latest Egyptian. The page is taken from Demotic Egyptian Guide - Texts, exercises and vocabulary [2008, Leonardo Caldas Vieira], page 140.


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Unlike with British English, there don't appear to be a lot of books about American English pronunciation that touch on such technical aspects but are still accessible to learners, presumably because of the paradigm shift that took place in the 1960s ignited by the emergence of sociolinguistics. So one has to look to the early-to-mid 20th century to find an ...


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Some languages (e.g. Georgian) have adverbial case which turns adjectives and nouns into adverbs, and it's a 'real' case. However, as far as I know, it's not used in the multiplicative meaning. Generally speaking, if in a language several parts of speech can be declined, there can hardly exist a case which is used exclusively with just one part of speech, ...


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There are no such scientifically reliable online tests, though as you may know you can find some online tests for just about anything. One could participate in an offline test (if someone else were to set it up for you). There are a number of kinds of tests, which test different things (so you have to decide more precisely what you want to test), though your ...


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I was recently pointed to Kilani's 2019 Vocalisation in Group Writing: A New Proposal, which is significantly more modern than Hoch and focuses on the principles underlying group-writing rather than the representations of individual Semitic words. It's also, conveniently, available to read for free. Unlike Hoch, Kilani proposes that three types of "...


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"Best" is subjective. Grammatical theory: From transformational grammar to constraint-based approaches. Fourth revised and extended edition is updated frequently, and fairly comprehensive. This might be a good place to start.


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Part I of Hoch's Semitic Words in Egyptian Texts of the New Kingdom and Third Intermediate Period lists almost 600 transcriptions of Semitic names and terms, mainly in group-writing. Each one lists out all the different ways it was spelled in hieroglyphs, a transliteration of each, and a transliteration of the original as best can be approximated. For a ...


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There is no single diagram for all sounds, but there are diagrams for each sound. For those sounds that have movement in the manner and place of articulation (or other dimensions) then two or more diagrams are needed. That said, there are only sammy diagrams for some languages and these are not published (as far as I know) systematically. The key is to focus ...


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Limited etymological info for French (40,000 words), along with around 20 other languages: https://etymologeek.com/fra/a


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Thai and Lao are prime areas of exploration for the interface of lexical and post-lexical tone phonology. There does seem to be a lack of tone sandhi in the same way that many varieties of Chinese, such as Standard Mandarin or mainstream Xiamen (Amoy) & Taiwanese Hokkien / Southern Min have. But Lao does have some interesting features in its synchronic ...


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