Skip to main content
28 votes

How similar are Ukrainian and Russian?

Ukrainian and Russian are partially mutual intelligible. I as a native Russian speaker can read Ukrainian and usually understand the most but spoken Ukrainian is relatively hard to understand, ...
user36820's user avatar
  • 289
28 votes
Accepted

Are the vast majority of Ukrainians more proficient in Russian than Ukrainian?

After researching this a bit, I'm posting an answer to my own question, but I want to say that I welcome more answers, especially if they bring other pieces of evidence. A 2008 Gallup poll asked ...
MWB's user avatar
  • 1,112
26 votes
Accepted

What is the function of the soft sign (Ь) in Russian?

WARNING: The question is sooo many-sided, it is very wide and can be split into at least 3 different questions. I'll answer it all, don't tell me later that you haven't been warned the answer would be ...
Yellow Sky's user avatar
  • 18.5k
19 votes

How similar are Ukrainian and Russian?

The mutual intelligibility of the Slavic languages (going far beyond the pair Ukrainian and Russian) is a fascinating theme for linguistic research, and there are works out there trying to measure the ...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
19 votes

How similar are Ukrainian and Russian?

You have 2 questions in 1: How mutually intelligible the 2 languages are. What's more practical to help refugees. In terms of mutual intelligibility, it highly depends on context, an educated (the ...
Eugene's user avatar
  • 447
16 votes

Why does Russian not vary from region to region?

First of all, it varies to some extent. People from Ural region, people from Rostov-on-Don, people from Vyatka region have quite recognisable pronunciation norms. The same with vocabulary, there's ...
shabunc's user avatar
  • 919
14 votes

How similar are Ukrainian and Russian?

Russian and Ukranian are mutually intelligeable to a significant degree... perhaps to greater extent than, e.g., French and Italian. However, it is necessary to keep in mind that the situation with ...
Roger V.'s user avatar
  • 980
14 votes
Accepted

If Hebrew is not related to Slavic, why are there apparent sound correspondences?

Just as you cannot compare two random species today to accurately assess their taxonomy (otherwise we would conclude all crabs form a single family when they actually form at least five distinct ...
Tristan's user avatar
  • 8,809
13 votes

Are the vast majority of Ukrainians more proficient in Russian than Ukrainian?

Looking at this from a software developer's perspective, there's a significant factor here that you may have overlooked. Translating a program or a website is a significant amount of work, testing, ...
bta's user avatar
  • 231
11 votes

Why are some Russian and Swedish words so strikingly similar? Два - två, по-шведски - på svenska, etc

You've mixed a bunch of words of very different origin with a bunch of quite weak and poorly defined assumptions (like no considerable interactions between Russians and Swedes). It comes as no ...
shabunc's user avatar
  • 919
11 votes
Accepted

How can I find the frequency for the Russian word "чем-нибудь"?

Asking the Leipzig Wortschatz Projekt gives the answer: Word: чем-нибудь Number of occurrences: 5,018 Rank: 33,962 Frequency class: 14 Information on the corpus: Information on corpus: Russian Mixed ...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
11 votes

If Hebrew is not related to Slavic, why are there apparent sound correspondences?

what can be done to rule out false sound correspondences when reconstructing proto-languages The main thing that is commonly done is to not directly compare random words from the modern languages, ...
user6726's user avatar
  • 83.2k
11 votes

Is Russian the most diverged Slavic language?

Your question shows that you are unfamiliar with both Russian and other slavic languages. To add to Anixx's answer: Think: misliet - misliet - misliec - misliti - misliti - mislityi - mislyati - dumat ...
Eugene's user avatar
  • 447
9 votes
Accepted

Can "da" phrase endings used in Russian and Kannada be traced back to the same origin (as in usage, not like cognates)?

Absolutely not. Its similar to asking if Kannada word alla, which is a negation suffix and also a separate word for no/not, is same as the Islamic deity. It's just coincidence. They are false friends. ...
vin's user avatar
  • 611
9 votes
Accepted

On the phonetics of Russian ы

Russian ⟨ы⟩ can be a little difficult to master, especially if one wishes for a native-like pronunciation. When stressed, the vowel in question is a close central unrounded vowel: IPA /ɨ/. But, as ...
sami.spricht.sprache's user avatar
9 votes

Why are some Russian and Swedish words so strikingly similar? Два - två, по-шведски - på svenska, etc

@shabunc has treated the other examples already, so I will say something about the bear's service: The same idiom is also present in German Bärendienst and it is traced to a fable by La Fontaine ...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
9 votes
Accepted

Do Russian-Ukrainian bilinguals or speakers immersed in both languages switch between the pair [ʂ ʐ] and [ʃ ʒ] when they switch between the languages?

TL;DR: The difference between the two pairs is substantial. Native speakers intuitively use phones so not to get trapped into the adjacent phoneme. The differences between [ʃ ʒ] and [ʂ ʐ] are pretty ...
Be Brave Be Like Ukraine's user avatar
9 votes

How can I find the frequency for the Russian word "чем-нибудь"?

Using the Araneum Russicum III corpus (I am linking to the readily available 125Mtokens subcorpus; after a (free) registration you get access to the whole huge 19Gtokens one; the results are from the ...
Radovan Garabík's user avatar
9 votes

Are the vast majority of Ukrainians more proficient in Russian than Ukrainian?

The answer is certainly no. We cannot say that this is true for the "vast" majority (say 80%), but maybe this is 50/50. In the south and east, people speak better russian due to their roots (...
Gospadi's user avatar
  • 91
7 votes

Which languages have absorbed the most vocabulary from Russian, and which languages have influenced its vocabulary?

My guess is this question has more to do with history and culture than language per se. You can say that English was influenced by French 'a lot' due to the Norman conquest (you can probably speak ...
alexsms's user avatar
  • 171
7 votes

Is Russian the most diverged Slavic language?

You have just picked Russian synonyms that are not related to the words in the other Slavic languages that you picked. You can pick other synonyms. Think: мыслить (myslit') I have: я имею (ya imeyu) ...
Anixx's user avatar
  • 6,685
6 votes

American English speakers needing subtitles more often

My guess is that this is not a matter of the language, but rather of the sound quality. Most films come with the original audio in (American) English where the actors speak right during the acting ...
Natalie Clarius's user avatar
6 votes
Accepted

Origin of the word/root 'del'

These words are related, but they do not have any known cognates outside of Germanic and Balto-Slavic. “Proto-Indo-European *dʰayl-, *dʰoyl-“ (as posited on Wikipedia) is highly uncertain. It has been ...
fdb's user avatar
  • 24.3k
6 votes
Accepted

Modern theories of Russian syntax

Sebastian Shaumyan proposed an order-free theory of syntax which has some currency in the U.S. However, I don't know whether Shaumyan's work was the historical source of the Western versions. I heard ...
Greg Lee's user avatar
  • 12.5k
6 votes

Which languages have absorbed the most vocabulary from Russian, and which languages have influenced its vocabulary?

You can find examples of words borrowed into Russian language on Wiktionary RU. However, this is far from being a comprehensive list. The number of words borrowed from Turkic languages is somewhere ...
Vitaly's user avatar
  • 161
6 votes

At some point, was г/Г pronounced in Russian like it still is in Ukrainian (somewhat akin to h/H in hotel, i.e. /h/)? Or is it purely regional?

The pronunciation of г as /h/ is purely regional (Southern dialects) by now; diachronically, it used to be /g/ in Proto-Slavic and that changed into /h/ in some languages (Ukrainian, Belorussian, ...
Radovan Garabík's user avatar
5 votes

Are the English word "charm" and Russian word "чары" etymologically related?

As it was mentioned in the comments, you have already given an answer. But let us make it more obvious. Russian чары has a convincing Proto-Slavic reconstruction *čarъ (this word has many Slavic ...
Aer's user avatar
  • 520
5 votes

On the phonetics of Russian ы

The simplest way is probably this: pronounce the [u] sound (as in ’soon’, for example) and then try to unround your lips, without changing the position of the tongue.
gleisner_robot's user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

How would've the Old Novgorodian language looked like?

The best reference on Old Novgorod is Andrey Zaliznyak's 2004 monograph, Древненовгородский диалект (Drevnenovgorodskij dialekt, 2nd ed.), freely available online https://inslav.ru/publication/...
Alex B.'s user avatar
  • 8,744
5 votes

How can I find the frequency for the Russian word "чем-нибудь"?

The online version of Russian Nation Corpus (in Russian) offers frequency statistics of word forms, broken down by year: https://processing.ruscorpora.ru/graphic.xml?env=alpha&mode=graphic_main&...
Quassnoi's user avatar
  • 699

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible