Hot answers tagged

4

The scope of logical elements (including modal verbs and adverbs) is, in my view, one of the least understood areas of the syntax and semantics of natural language. As TKR points out in his comment, word order is not necessarily decisive for determining scope relations. Perhaps the most widely discussed type of examples where one can see that word order is ...


2

The sentence formed by combining an element with others is the scope of that element. (Sometimes the element which is said to have a scope is itself excluded from that scope, but including it comes closer to the original account given in Hans Reichenbach's Elements of Symbolic Logic. It doesn't generally matter which policy one follows,) For instance, in ...


1

It seems to me that with sufficient framing, all three readings are possible (if not perhaps always straightforward): Arthur explains things to his children kindly because he loves them. But discipline his children because he loves them, Arthur does not. You should discipline your children out of love. Arthur beats his children out of frustration. But ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible