Skip to main content
6 votes

Is ending a sentence with a possessive considered informal?

Here are the number of times that each possessive pronoun appeared at the end of each sentence in the British National Corpus per million words: spoken fiction magazine newspaper non-...
WavesWashSands's user avatar
6 votes

Language acquisition by 100% immersion -- any cases you know of?

Do linguistic field workers count? In this case I offer the case of Daniel Everett who learned the Pirahã language from scratch by contact with the native people without having any common language. Of ...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
5 votes

The benefits of studying a second language with word-by-word translations in one's mother tongue

I don't know of actual research, but from my personal experience: I agree that word-by-word translations will on the one hand lack features that are not available in the target language and on the ...
Natalie Clarius's user avatar
4 votes

How "fluent" do professional classicists get in reading Latin and Greek? How do they do it?

Until fairly recently, pupils in elite schools in European countries began learning Latin and Greek at a very early age, and gained a high level of fluency before going on to university; this included ...
fdb's user avatar
  • 24.2k
4 votes
Accepted

I don't know what my L1 is and want to find out

You have to first determine how you are going to define "L1", which isn't a scientific term in linguistics. It sort of stands for "first language", in which case Russian is your L1. Though perhaps ...
user6726's user avatar
  • 83.1k
4 votes
Accepted

How to read and understand linguistics articles?

This suggests a possible meta-study on intelligibility of technical works by native and non-native speakers. A technical paper in phonology might be unintelligible because of the linguistic structure ...
user6726's user avatar
  • 83.1k
4 votes
Accepted

Is it possible to speak like a native speaker of English by mastering the phonology?

Learning the rules of phonology in a language might make the lowest levels of acquisition easier in some languages that have complicated phonologies (such as first-year Arabic or Klamath), perhaps 10% ...
user6726's user avatar
  • 83.1k
4 votes
Accepted

Ease of L2 acquisition of SOV and SVO/VSO word order

Many SOV languages are head final. Korean and Japanese are famous examples. In head final languages, sentences that begin with a subordinate clause are temporarily ambiguous. In other words, the ...
John Duda's user avatar
4 votes

Is it possible to talk about two different phonemes if they always have the same manifestations?

This (strong absolute neutralization) is theoretically possible although has not yet been shown to exist. The closest case is Yawelmani, where the phonemes u:, o: are realized as [o:] everywhere. ...
user6726's user avatar
  • 83.1k
4 votes

Are markedness and the Sonority Sequencing Principle both language universals?

It has been claimed that markedness and sonority sequencing are universals, but whether or not they are depends very much on what is meant by "universal". The usual understanding of the ...
user6726's user avatar
  • 83.1k
4 votes

Language acquisition by 100% immersion -- any cases you know of?

I bet historically that was not an uncommon occurrence up to the early 20th century. Nakahama Manjirō springs to mind, who was shipwrecked off the coast of Japan and then immersed himself in the ...
Nardog's user avatar
  • 4,941
4 votes

Language acquisition by 100% immersion -- any cases you know of?

I recently learned about William Buckley on the Futility Closet podcast. Buckley was an English escaped convict who lived with Indigenous Australians for decades. He learned the language of the people ...
d_b's user avatar
  • 141
3 votes

Speakers of a foreign language in a nation sounding similar in 'mispronunciations'

In some cases this would likely be due to L1 transfer and differences in the markedness of features between the L1 and target language. Markedness in second language acquisition refers to a closed set ...
CamStew's user avatar
  • 146
3 votes

I don't know what my L1 is and want to find out

How is "L1" used in these texts you're reading? Is it a) about the influence of the L1 on the syntax and pronunciation of the L2? b) is it just about the L2 label for a new adult learned language? ...
Mitch's user avatar
  • 4,455
3 votes

How to know whether a word is context appropriate?

When I was learning German I was advised to buy a Stilwörterbuch (by Duden, as I recall) which provides this kind of context and usage. It's used like a dictionary, in that you look up the word (e.g. ...
postmortes's user avatar
3 votes

Speakers of a foreign language in a nation sounding similar in 'mispronunciations'

In part, it is due to a third factor, the local dialect of L2. In the case of French as taught in the US, to the extent that there is a characteristic American-accented version of French, it is ...
user6726's user avatar
  • 83.1k
3 votes

Is there a concept to describe "a way of saying something that is incorrect, but occurs frequently due to the speaker speaking a second language"?

Since the question is tagged as "translation", the examples quoted in the question are just translation errors. There are more subtle effects that are not errors by still exhibiting the ...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
3 votes

One can learn faster if he listens to his own voice speaking in target language?

Listening to your own recordings, especially compared to recordings of native speakers, can help you to notice the differences. Using AI to read an audio book in your voice will probably not do much. ...
Dakkaron's user avatar
  • 151
3 votes

Why do nouns typically have their main stress on the penultimate while verbs on the ultimate (according to theories other than that of Hayes)?

One version of a "why" answer is to study the history of the system: I would recommend looking at this paper and references therein (Danielsson 1948; Dresher & Lahiri 2005; Fikkert, ...
user6726's user avatar
  • 83.1k
2 votes

How can you learn to read older dialects of your first language(s)?

One approach that linguists use is to train themselves in reverse chronological order. I'd suggest you do the same: Read a few hundred pages in each century, going backwards. Choose similar genres ...
Lefty G Balogh's user avatar
2 votes

What method of teaching foreign languages is more effective?

I would say that methods come in an out of fashion. Often this is like a pendulum swing (rote learning is popular, then falls out of fashion and is considered ineffective, then later its importance is ...
CuriousTeacher's user avatar
2 votes

How many words do we hear in a day?

Given that a day has 86400 seconds, and we spend around 57600 seconds awake and 56340 seconds according to one credible source (Statisca claims: "This statistic displays information on the amount ...
Anonymous's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

Sources on average retention rate of language based on time

ACTFL has a detailed list of language learning goals/outcomes and offers a comparative scale of achievement in relation to classroom hours. They correlate various levels of language skill comparing ...
AnneZahra's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

Educating people in their mother tongue

I suspect that there are not any good studies that will give you a comprehensive answer. You might be able to find a compilation of official national educational policies that covers a sufficient ...
user6726's user avatar
  • 83.1k
2 votes

L2 acquisition as a factor in loss of "complex" grammatical features

First, I don't think English really did get simpler, it just moved its complexity into other parts of the language. Less inflectional morphology, but more complicated word order rules, and many more ...
abarnert's user avatar
  • 2,625
2 votes

L2 acquisition as a factor in loss of "complex" grammatical features

I think you need to start with language change, rather than a question of complexity. One might "lose" some lexical complexity on the one hand, but introduce ambiguity which brings more cognitive ...
MJM's user avatar
  • 121
2 votes
Accepted

Do people "babble" while learning an L2?

I don't know if it's common, but I vaguely remember mumbling or muttering to myself when I was first learning Japanese. In my case, I think it was a way of trying to parse the stream of sounds that I ...
Philippe's user avatar
  • 256
2 votes

Speakers of a foreign language in a nation sounding similar in 'mispronunciations'

By far the biggest cause is differences in the phonology of the first language and the target language. Whatever sounds are in your first language (your phonological inventory) basically is your base ...
CuriousTeacher's user avatar
2 votes

Is there a concept to describe "a way of saying something that is incorrect, but occurs frequently due to the speaker speaking a second language"?

In the teaching / academic world, this is known as 'L1 transfer' (L1 = your first language). If the speaker shoots and misses, it is known as 'negative L1 transfer'. However, sometimes mentally ...
CuriousTeacher's user avatar
2 votes

English speakers inserting R in French words

This is conjecture, but it's conjecture that's too long to put into the comments. Tl:dr French /dʀw/ and /tʀw/ are likely to be analysed as /dw/ or /tw/ by English speakers. Because the realisations ...
Araucaria - him's user avatar

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible