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12

Because of the way different sounds developed in English and in languages that English got words from, the sequence "ooch" tends not to regularly arise in words with the most common kinds of origins. However, that doesn't prevent "ooch" from occurring in words that are onomatopoeic (in a broad sense) or sound symbolic. I think sound ...


9

Absolutely not. Its similar to asking if Kannada word alla, which is a negation suffix and also a separate word for no/not, is same as the Islamic deity. It's just coincidence. They are false friends. This da phrase ending, which sort of replaces dude in English, is actually a suffix and it is not of Kannada origin. It is of Tamil origin and it is a bona ...


6

I can think of two main factors which would motivate such a decision. Social Prestige A diglossia is any situation where two dialects (or languages) exist along side each other in a single region/community. The most obvious example of this would be the co-occurrence in many parts of China of a local Chinese dialect (Cantonese, Hakka, Hokkien, etc.) with ...


5

A number of those words are borrowed from other languages, for example kloo(t)ch is Chinook Jargon and the original source seems to be Nootka. "Brooch" is a variant of "broach" pronounced with [o] not [u], and while I pronounce "brooch" with [o], I know others in the same dialect zone pronounce it with [u]. I think this is a spelling pronunciation -- "ooch" ...


4

MT is hard. Google Translate is based on statistical methods with models trained on large bilingual corpora. There are a few rule-based systems that produce better translations but only in closed specialized domains. As for now nobody has an algorithm or method that performs better. It's impossible to predict the future but I wouldn't hope for ...


4

Slang isn't necessarily pejorative but, as you mentioned, it does imply use in particular groups. If the phrase started as slang in the '60s and has already become mainstream, colloquial or informal should be more suitable. There's no clear threshold. Jargon is more like a sublanguage used in a particular field of science, engineering, etc, so not ...


3

There's nothing syntactically unusual about such uses of these expressions, though how exactly they're deployed and understood is debatable: you may consider them either as orthographically abbreviated finite clauses (I'm laughing my ass off) or as abbreviations recategorized as words—specifically, as adverbs. In either case they act syntactically as ...


3

Slang is generally very informal language used a specific segment of speakers of a language. An example of slang (that I just found on the internet) is the word "Bandini", which is supposedly a word meaning "nonsense" used in Los Angeles. Colloquial speech refers to everyday speech that people use informally. Colloquial speech can include a great deal of ...


3

As WavesWashSands points out, slang is a subset of language use, so it can be studied using any of the tools we use to study language in general. For example, you can study the interesting phonological rules of verlan in French; the morphology of a simplified conjugation paradigm; the syntax of the various crystallized expressions; the semantics of ...


3

Your question makes some broadly misleading assumptions about both translation and machine translation. The problem here is not "grammatical" correctness. It's not a problem for Google to generate superficially grammatical sentences. But sentences only appear as part of text/utterance which is the really carrier of communicative meaning. Any one word or ...


2

I don't know the research here, but my guess is that people simply memorize the rhyming slang, just as you would memorize any other idiom. Those that are sufficiently frequent hat everyone in the community knows them could then get shortened. A good way to test the last bit would be to collect a corpus of rhyming slang and see if it's the most frequent ...


2

Wow, the example is indeed probably offensive to some, and I apologize in advance to anyone who is offended by the fact that I am now going to risk an answer. I agree with the question's premise that one hell of a is frozen expression that functions syntactically like an adjective. Thus one hell of a is an adjective modifying dick. Interestingly, the ...


2

In Chinese, Martian Language comes to mind, also an Internet phenomenon. Martian language (Wikipedia) They substitute characters for 近形字 (characters that look similar) or 同音字 (homophonous characters), and other scripts that obfuscate the language. They've even made a Simplified Chinese<->Martian converter here. I input some poetry inside, and here's ...


1

The origin and roles are different since Kannada is a Dravidian language, not a relative of the Japanese or Basque, while Russian makes a part of the Slavic branch within the Indo-European family. The role of the Russian word is a particle (connecting sentence parts) or 'yes'-word, or an intensifier related either to a pronoun or, which I beleibe to be more ...


1

According to the following sourse, the expression "break/bust my balls" comes from the old practice of cattle castration: Whether it’s busting or breaking, balls or stones, this expression has long been used by young men (and not a few women) to express a wide range of emotions brought about by the words or actions of another. Although the ...


1

glitz/glitzy entered English via Yiddish, but has nothing to do with Galicia. Like much of the Yiddish lexicon they have close cousins in standard German and German dialects and more distant cousins in modern English. (English cognates are glitter and glisten.)


1

This is not a scientific account, it may not be accurate, nor am i an expert on the subject. Just what I gathered over the years, for what it is worth, in case it may help. Fifty years ago (and earlier), it was still a general policy in France to forbid the use of dialects in schools. They had posters against it, and students could be punished for not ...


1

It is similar to Eye dialect—a kind of constructed accent in written language. P.S. See also this question: We have constructed languages, but are there constructed accents?


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