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Epenthesis of /u/ before the syllabic sonorant "l"

There has never been any sound u before the syllabic sonorant l in the Slavic words for “wolf” and “full”. Proto-Balto-Slavic (PBS) *wilkás (“wolf”) and *pilnas (“full”) begat Proto-Slavic (PS) *...
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3 votes

Epenthesis of /u/ before the syllabic sonorant "l"

Epenthesis with /u/ is also seen in Lithuanian (near labiovelars) with all syllabic resonants, and in Albanian (with unclear conditioning) for both l & r, whilst Sanskrit uses a /u:/ (or /u/) in ...
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12 votes
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If Hebrew is not related to Slavic, why there are apparent sound correspondences?

Just as you cannot compare two random species today to accurately assess their taxonomy (otherwise we would conclude all crabs form a single family when they actually form at least five distinct ...
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If Hebrew is not related to Slavic, why there are apparent sound correspondences?

The example of 'six' is interesting. It has been noted for over a hundred years that the word for 'six' (and for that matter 'seven' as well) are very similar in Indo-european and Afro-asiatic ...
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8 votes

If Hebrew is not related to Slavic, why there are apparent sound correspondences?

what can be done to rule out false sound correspondences when reconstructing proto-languages The main thing that is commonly done is to not directly compare random words from the modern languages, ...
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4 votes
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Pronunciation of г in Old Novgorodian

Old Novgorodian <г> was plosive [g], and Zaliznyak in his treatise explicitly states it, this feature cannot be avoided to be mentioned, especially in such a fundamental work as Zaliznyak’s. The ...
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