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4

The best reference on Old Novgorod is Andrey Zaliznyak's 2004 monograph, Древненовгородский диалект (Drevnenovgorodskij dialekt, 2nd ed.), freely available online https://inslav.ru/publication/zaliznyak-drevnenovgorodskiy-dialekt-2-e-izd-m-2004 (this is the official website of the Institute of Slavic Studies of the Russian Academy of Sciences) There’s an ...


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I learn Swedish now and I see a lot of similarities to Polish language as well. But I’m not surprised. I am aware of common roots of the Slavic and Germanic languages. I’m also aware that being close neighbours we borrowed some words in both directions. Maybe more from Germanic to Slavic but in opposite direction it worked as well. I like the name of the ...


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The so-called "Sound Law" and the thing that was regular is 1500 or more years old, when it was a general rule of articulation in the proto-language. It was a subconscious, unavoidable "law" in the same way that aspiration is in most dialects of English. It did not produce č, it produced fronted kʲ. Subsequently, this process was ...


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However I am now curious to understand why then in some Czech words there are velar consonants next to front vowels. The commonest case is the "kind of" front vowel y. If you listen carefully, you will see that this vowel is completely different from i, at least to the Czech ear. I am not thinking about obvious loanwords, but about basic words ...


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