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3 votes

Does anyone actually use /æ/ as an emphatic article?

The vowel in question is (IPA) [a], not [æ]. The [æ]→[a] relation between US and Canadian English is common ([a] in Canada for US [æ]). Myers is just being weird: the article could be [ei] / [e] in ...
user6726's user avatar
  • 83.1k
2 votes

Was Katherine Hepburn's accent consistently, totally non-rhotic?

Her public performance accent was a stage affectation, which she adopted via training. There are no recordings of her pre-professional voice. Interviews in the 90's indicate that off-stage, she ...
user6726's user avatar
  • 83.1k
2 votes

Best phonetic/ phonology resource for learning accents?

You may want to look at the ICE corpora that contain both spoken and written regional variants of English. Many of them are freely usable for noncommercial academic research.
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
2 votes

About [s] being replaced by the voiceless postalveolar fricative in the US

Without specific examples, it's hard to say what exactly you're hearing. Different languages (or accents) have different boundaries for what exactly counts as /s/ vs. /ʃ/, so it's possible that the ...
brass tacks's user avatar
  • 18.3k
2 votes

About [s] being replaced by the voiceless postalveolar fricative in the US

This retraction happens when [s] is in a consonant cluster with a following [ɹ] (as in the video you linked, "just straight up"). The reason is articulatory: the retroflex gesture of the [ɹ] is ...
TKR's user avatar
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1 vote

About [s] being replaced by the voiceless postalveolar fricative in the US

Are you observing it in the south/ in Texas for example? I would assume that you are actually noticing a retracted [s̠] that I usually notice in a Texas accent, Dutch, European Spanish, Icelandic... ...
unknown_person_1000's user avatar
1 vote

Should I include this piece in the vowel? [spectrogram]

It seems good. The vocal folds continue to vibrate a little bit after your boundary, even though the tongue and the lips were already articulating a stop, but it is just a coarticulation phenomenon. ...
amegnunsen's user avatar
  • 1,525
1 vote

Source on approximant fortition

Vulgar Latin to modern Romance This is very likely well known to you. The emergence of the phoneme /ʒ/ written "j", from /j/. Classical Latin ego /ˈe.ɡo/, probably elided the middle /g/ to form ...
Michaelyus's user avatar
  • 7,476
1 vote

Source on approximant fortition

The feature theory of palatalization in The Sound Pattern of English is meant to cover historical developments in Slavic. Another reference that occurs to me is a paper by Bhat on palatalization from ...
Greg Lee's user avatar
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