3

The vowel in question is (IPA) [a], not [æ]. The [æ]→[a] relation between US and Canadian English is common ([a] in Canada for US [æ]). Myers is just being weird: the article could be [ei] / [e] in parts of Canada and the US, or [ə] and not [æ,a] in any variety of North American English that I've encountered.


2

'J' stands for /dʒ/ in Indonesian, Somali, Malay, Igbo, Shona, Oromo, Turkmen, and Zulu. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J


2

You may want to look at the ICE corpora that contain both spoken and written regional variants of English. Many of them are freely usable for noncommercial academic research.


2

Without specific examples, it's hard to say what exactly you're hearing. Different languages (or accents) have different boundaries for what exactly counts as /s/ vs. /ʃ/, so it's possible that the speakers you are hearing do not really "replace" their /s/ with [ʃ], but just use a pronunciation that sounds more like [ʃ] to you. But it's also possible that ...


2

This retraction happens when [s] is in a consonant cluster with a following [ɹ] (as in the video you linked, "just straight up"). The reason is articulatory: the retroflex gesture of the [ɹ] is anticipated, so the [s] becomes retroflex/postalveolar too. It's an assimilation. This is pretty common in US English: I associate it with Southern and African-...


1

It seems good. The vocal folds continue to vibrate a little bit after your boundary, even though the tongue and the lips were already articulating a stop, but it is just a coarticulation phenomenon. Yet, your burst seems very long and energetic for a [b].


1

Vulgar Latin to modern Romance This is very likely well known to you. The emergence of the phoneme /ʒ/ written "j", from /j/. Classical Latin ego /ˈe.ɡo/, probably elided the middle /g/ to form Vulgar Latin *eo, which must have been pronouced something like /jo/, yielding modern Sardinian eo /ˈɛo/, Spanish yo /jo/, Italian io /ˈi.o/, but Central Catalan ...


1

The feature theory of palatalization in The Sound Pattern of English is meant to cover historical developments in Slavic. Another reference that occurs to me is a paper by Bhat on palatalization from a Stanford project on universals of language. My own observation is that the articulations of English syllable onset and syllable offset jod are quite ...


1

Are you observing it in the south/ in Texas for example? I would assume that you are actually noticing a retracted [s̠] that I usually notice in a Texas accent, Dutch, European Spanish, Icelandic... It's actually an old s sound presumably the kind of s that many medieval European languages had.


1

In some Romanizations of Armenian, "j" is used for the letter ջ, which is pronounced [dʒ] in Eastern Armenian, or for ճ, pronounced [dʒ] in Western. These Armenian letters are also sometimes transcribed (especially in older texts) using "j^", i.e., "j" with a hachek instead of a dot. In this case, the regular "j" (with a dot) would be used for the sound [dz]...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible