5

The winners are probably writing systems with heterograms: words written in one language but spoken in another. We actually have a few of these in English, such as the abbreviation "e.g." which stands for Latin exemplī grātiā but is usually read aloud as the English equivalent "for example". Examples: In Hittite cuneiform, the written ...


3

What you are describing isn't an innovation, as we talk about linguistic innovations, it's just a fact of the language. An innovation might be something like the rise of up-talk. but it's so widespread that it's not new anymore. From a multi-generational perspective i.e. compared to speech 150 years ago, perhaps, but the data is sparse. One thing to consider ...


3

In conjecturing about "what is possible" in language, we make some basic assumptions. First, there isn't a substantial difference between the past vs. the future in terms of "what is possible", at least as long as you don't go 100,000 years back in the past. Second, there's no difference between written languages and un-written languages. ...


2

Tibetan is probably the language written in an alphabet, where the gap between actual spoken phonetics and what's written is just enormous. Many letters are not pronounced and those which are pronounced are often different from what one would expect.


2

The term commonly used in linguistics appears to be tempo. According to the book Innovative Presentations for Dummies, other terms are rate of speech, speed, pace and rhythm.


1

The following are the reasons why Korean and Japanese sound similar. Basic sounds of consonants and vowels are very similar. Japanese doesn't have certain vowels that exist in Korean. Japanese also doesn't use consonants as the last sound in a syllable with an exception of 'n'. Korean doesn't have the 'z' sound that exists in Japanese. Otherwise, they are ...


1

A very small contribution to a huge topic. Among speakers of non-Putonghua dialects and Putonghua speakers of limited literacy, the officially taught Chinese characters are often regarded as "correct" compared to their own dialect or idiolect. From time to time they will explain that their own pronunciation of some words is "uneducated" ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible