36 votes
Accepted

Why are J, U, W considered part of the basic Latin Alphabet?

Despite its name, the ISO Basic Latin Alphabet isn't particularly concerned with representing Latin. It was developed in the modern day, so the fact that I~J and U~V weren't consistently distinguished ...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 66.2k
20 votes
Accepted

Why are letters with a stroke not decomposed in Unicode?

Contrary to what the other answers have stated, the Unicode Standard does not actually care whether Ø or Ð or any other character is “fundamentally a different letter” or not, whatever that may even ...
CharlotteBuff's user avatar
11 votes

Why are J, U, W considered part of the basic Latin Alphabet?

Is it just a coincidence that English is the only major language that used all these letters and no more in its orthography? Is it a coincidence? No. But that's not the right test, because there are ...
Adam Bittlingmayer's user avatar
11 votes

Is there a difference between Belgian Dutch (i.e. Flemish) and Vlaams?

Vlaams is Flemish. Vlaams is the Flemish word for "Flemish". Whether to regard this as a separate language (that's vls) or as a variant/dialect/whatever of Dutch (nl-BE), seems to be a matter of ...
Omar and Lorraine's user avatar
10 votes

Why does ISO 639-3 have many language codes for Arabic but only one for English?

Are the languages spoken in various Arabian countries actually mutually intelligible? If no then it makes more sense to regard them as separate languages. In China the government likes to officially ...
xji's user avatar
  • 603
8 votes
Accepted

Does the orientation of the voiced uvular fricative IPA symbol (ʁ) not matter, or are these fonts buggy?

This appears to be a bug in Apple's system font San Francisco. The International Phonetic Association designates the symbol for a voiced uvular fricative to be "Inverted small capital R", ʁ, ...
Nardog's user avatar
  • 4,941
8 votes
Accepted

Is there a standard ISO language code for ”other”?

Two-letter codes are defined in ISO 639-1 and the current list does not contain a code for "other". (As Wikipedia's list of ISO 639-1 codes shows, not all possible two-letter codes have been ...
Tsundoku's user avatar
  • 533
8 votes

Why does ISO 639-3 have many language codes for Arabic but only one for English?

Unifying and subdividing speech forms under an ISO code is not a rigorous ontological claim: it is the standardization statement "this linguistic thing is to be abbreviated that way". "Quechua", "...
user6726's user avatar
  • 83.1k
7 votes
Accepted

Which language code set (WALS, Linguasphere, ISO 639‑3 or Glottolog) should be the basis for a comparative linguistic project?

If you can afford the extra work, use as many of the lists as possible, of course using explicit tags declaring from which set the code is taken, e.g., <languagecode type="iso639-3">eng</...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
6 votes
Accepted

Is there a difference between Belgian Dutch (i.e. Flemish) and Vlaams?

"Flemish" technically has a different meaning from "Belgian Standard Dutch" — the latter being the standard form of the Dutch language as spoken in Belgium, much like how "Holland" is often used as a ...
Zorf's user avatar
  • 320
6 votes
Accepted

Change reason for ISO 639 Hebrew language code from iw-IL to he-IL

iw comes from Iwrit or Iwrith, a somewhat-archaic German borrowing of עברית‎ (the more common German term nowadays, in my experience, is Hebräische). In the 1989 revisions, two of the changes involved ...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 66.2k
6 votes

Why are letters with a stroke not decomposed in Unicode?

For the same reason that eth (Ðð) doesn't compose into Dd + COMBINING SHORT STROKE OVERLAY. Namely, it looks like a D with a stroke through it, but it's fundamentally a different letter, and there's ...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 66.2k
5 votes
Accepted

Norwegian Translation Codes (no, nn, nb) - Which to use on a website?

I assume your concern is with regard to Norwegians and not compliance with some statutory requirement (if there is any such requirement, which I doubt, I am certain that it wasn't arrived at by ...
user6726's user avatar
  • 83.1k
4 votes

IPA consonant chart confusion, which chart to use?

The official chart published by the International Phonetic Association is the official standard and thus should be used as the primary reference. The primary difference between the official chart and ...
Nardog's user avatar
  • 4,941
4 votes
Accepted

Abbreviations for pinyin and hepburn transliterations?

ISO has codes for languages (ISO 639), and for scripts (ISO 15924); but it has no codes for transliterations, as you can see by perusing ISO's standards on Writing and Transliteration. ISO adopts and ...
Nick Nicholas's user avatar
4 votes

Why does ISO 639-3 have many language codes for Arabic but only one for English?

"Also except for some variations in North Africa Arabs" - this isn't just "some variations" - Moroccan Arabic and Tunisian Arabic are significantly different from Lebanese or Saudi (and from each ...
Alex Kinman's user avatar
4 votes

What is the name of the category that describes the ways a number can be read?

The rhythmic grouping of numbers is usually called "phrasing", e.g. "4-3 2-1-7 9-1-5-6". Within a "phrase", at least in English, there are still options regarding reading ...
user6726's user avatar
  • 83.1k
3 votes

What is the name of the category that describes the ways a number can be read?

I am not aware of any linguistic terminology for this particular kind of conventions. However, there is some applicable terminology from software engineering, particularly from the field of ...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
3 votes

Norwegian Translation Codes (no, nn, nb) - Which to use on a website?

As recommended by W3C, you should be using nb as it is more specific than the macrolanguage no. Use macrolanguages with care. Some language subtags have a Scope field set to macrolanguage, ie. this ...
soliz's user avatar
  • 131
3 votes
Accepted

ze_zh / ze_en - What language is associated with these codes?

I think this means that some of their data comes from a bilingual Chinese / English source. zh means Chinese and en means English, so it's reasonable that they invented ze to mean a bilingual data ...
Jetpack's user avatar
  • 226
3 votes

Where can I find a language code list that includes "OVD" and "OLV"? Are they not included in ISO 639?

The Wikipedia page is just out of date. If you check the edit history you'll see the latest edit is from 2013, but the ovd code was only created in 2015. SIL have an index which looks like it could ...
curiousdannii's user avatar
  • 6,192
3 votes

Why does ISO 639-3 have many language codes for Arabic but only one for English?

I'm not able to give you an authoritative answer, but here is my attempt at one. See "Macrolanguage" in Wikipedia and in SIL for more information. The distinction between a language and a dialect is ...
Colin Fine's user avatar
  • 7,454
3 votes

Metadata for a paper in the generative framework?

The names for the metadata fields that you drop sound like Dublin Core and the linked Wikipedia article has some explanation and further links. Note that Dublin Core metatada fields can occur in any ...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
3 votes

Is there a standard ISO language code for ”other”?

In Addition to @Tsundoku's answer, there is a kind of private use area in ISO 639-3: In addition, 520 codes in the range qaa–qtz are 'reserved for local use'. So you can assign in your application the ...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Where can I lookup what language corresponds to a IANA language tag?

You can look these up at IANA's own site: https://www.iana.org/assignments/language-tags/language-tags.xhtml#language-tags-1 In "Tags for the Identification of Languages" [BCP47] [RFC3066] ...
Mark Beadles's user avatar
  • 6,860
2 votes

IPA consonant chart confusion, which chart to use?

If your goal is to learn the IPA, you should use the official IPA chart (most current version, from the web page of the president of the IPA). Wikipedia's chart includes diacritics beyond the standard ...
user6726's user avatar
  • 83.1k
2 votes

Does the ISO 639 standard define mappings between ISO 639-5 language families and ISO 639-3 language?

ISO themselves do not define such a mapping, but there is now a mapping list by Jörg Tiedemann available that defines mapping between ISO 639-5 and ISO 639-3 and it also includes Glottolog codes. The ...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
2 votes

Is there a database or standard (ISO etc.) which maps Unicode or ISO-15924 scripts with the ISO-639/Glottolog etc. languages that use them

https://github.com/unicode-org/cldr/blob/main/common/supplemental/supplementalData.xml includes a map from two-letter or three-letter language to four-letter script, under element languageData. <...
Colonel Panic's user avatar
2 votes

Full list of ISO-639-6

Most likely, there never was a complete list. In October 2014 Peter Constable wrote the following in an e-mail to the IETF-languages mailing list (emphasis mine): While ISO 639-6 did get approved and ...
Tsundoku's user avatar
  • 533
2 votes

Identifying languages with useful 2-character search terms

Besides the languages already mentioned in the original question I suggest Vietnamese. It has a good wealth of two-Unicode-character words when encoded with precomposed characters (this precautions is ...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar

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