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23 votes

Pronunciation of P in Latin, versus Ph in Greek

I'm going to take a slightly different approach than Jk's answer, which does a good job coming at this from a Greco-Roman perspective. Instead, I'm going to focus on the Punic situation because it's a ...
Tristan's user avatar
  • 8,417
15 votes

Pronunciation of P in Latin, versus Ph in Greek

At some time in the history of the Greek languages, the letters Phi, Theta, and Chi represented aspirated consonants /ph/, /th/ and /kh/. The Romans felt that they were different enough from their ...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
7 votes
Accepted

What are partially voiced stops (as in Danish)?

Danish has no voiced plosives but two series of voiceless plosives, aspirated and unaspirated. These are typically transcribed with <p, t, k; b, d, ɡ> rather than the more phonetically ...
Nardog's user avatar
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7 votes
Accepted

Affrication-like sound in palatal plosive [c]

Having acoustically inspected these tokens as well as online tokens from Esling and Ladefoged, I notice that all performers have a longer voice onset time (around 20 msc, varying according to ...
user6726's user avatar
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5 votes

Are nasals stop consonants?

It's all about the manner of articulation. A stop consonant is by definition a sound produced by the complete obstruction of airflow though the mouth, at least for a short time. There are two kinds, ...
No Name's user avatar
  • 269
4 votes

Languages with a three-way distinction between voiced, aspirated, and unaspirated stops

Just to give you some more data, by analyzing the UPSID, I have come up with the following list of languages that specifically have this three way contrast in stops, and no other phonation ...
Mr. Nichan's user avatar
4 votes

Are nasals stop consonants?

The answer can be either yes or no—it comes down to your definition. Some people define "stop consonants" to be consonants where the airflow is completely stopped (as in, the opposite of continuant ...
Draconis's user avatar
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4 votes
Accepted

Lengthened voiced stops and the airstream through the nose

It is possible that you do lower the velum when you do this, and velum lowering is one of the methods that is used to alleviate the pressure buildup of voiced stops, but it is also possible that your ...
user6726's user avatar
  • 83.1k
4 votes
Accepted

Dental plosive with no apical obstruction

I have not seen all papers in phonology, but I don't think that a bidental plosive or a bidental stop (that would be technical terms for that sound) was ever described in literature. A bidental ...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
3 votes

Lengthened voiced stops and the airstream through the nose

If you're producing nasals then you must be allowing your velum to drop. No fair. You have to find some way to enlarge the closed air cavity above your larynx. There are several ways to do this. ...
Greg Lee's user avatar
  • 12.5k
3 votes

Are there any tonal languages with syllable-final consonants that are not unreleased, or even aspirated?

Outside the more ‘traditional’ areas of tonal languages, Swedish and Norwegian both have tones (albeit employed to a lesser degree than stereotypically tonal languages, being only distinguished in ...
Janus Bahs Jacquet's user avatar
3 votes

Are there any tonal languages with syllable-final consonants that are not unreleased, or even aspirated?

Punjabi is normally analysed as being tonal. They're rare, but syllable-final released stops may be found in words like /hʊkuːmət/ which I'm given to understand means "the secondmost" or ...
Omar and Lorraine's user avatar
3 votes

Are there languages with contrasting unvoiced aspirated, unaspirated, and ejective stops?

This is quite common. I would argue that that Georgian pattern is almost the same thing as the aspirated-unvoiced-ejective pattern. This variant where the plain stop is voiced occurs frequently in ...
Mr. Nichan's user avatar
2 votes

Are nasals stop consonants?

This being an obligatory answer to a question, we would have to know your instructor's ideology and instructional point – i.e. in the present instance, we can only offer reasonable interpretations of ...
user6726's user avatar
  • 83.1k
1 vote

Are there any tonal languages with syllable-final consonants that are not unreleased, or even aspirated?

Tibetan (at least most dialects) is normally considered tonal, and has at least a labial stop that's usually released in the syllable-final position. Depending on dialect and how the speaker is trying ...
R.. GitHub STOP HELPING ICE's user avatar
1 vote

Differences between /ᵐb/ (prenasalization) and /mb/

There is no phonetic difference, but there is also no phonetic unity supposed ᵐb / mb are pronounced in many different ways across languages. On occasion, there is an audible contrast between two such ...
user6726's user avatar
  • 83.1k
1 vote

Aspiration of voiced consonants

"Aspiration" is used in multiple ways, phonetically and phonologically, which can lead to some confusion, and Wiki reflects that confusion. Given that you're appealing to physical production and not ...
user6726's user avatar
  • 83.1k
1 vote

How to identify the English \t\ consonant in sound recordings?

You could use Acoustical characteristics of selected English consonants, by Ilse Lehiste, to determine what the formant transition patterns are, or the voicing patterns, that would be of interest to ...
user6726's user avatar
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