6 votes
Accepted

History and Reason of Portuguese accentuation marks

It is true that the earliest fragments of Galician-Portuguese have no stress marking, although they already make use of other diacritics such as the tilde and the cedilla. The first Portuguese grammar,...
Michaelyus's user avatar
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5 votes
Accepted

Do some languages use lexical stress to differentiate words with unrelated meanings?

I have some examples from Russian. дорога means "road, path" if the stress is on second syllable, but with the stress on the third syllable, it's an inflection of the word for "dear&...
Omar and Lorraine's user avatar
3 votes

Do some languages use lexical stress to differentiate words with unrelated meanings?

While consóle (provide comfort to) and cónsole (type of electronic device) are technically related, their meanings are distant enough that I doubt many English-speakers are aware of their shared ...
Draconis's user avatar
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3 votes

Why do nouns typically have their main stress on the penultimate while verbs on the ultimate (according to theories other than that of Hayes)?

One version of a "why" answer is to study the history of the system: I would recommend looking at this paper and references therein (Danielsson 1948; Dresher & Lahiri 2005; Fikkert, ...
user6726's user avatar
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3 votes
Accepted

In English, how exactly does intonation reflect stress?

Intonation is a phonetic add-on to a word at the sentential level, which can serve a variety of pragmatic purposes. Across languages, it usually cashes out as patterns of F0, amplitude, and duration ...
user6726's user avatar
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3 votes
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Phonemic transcriptions for English compound words

General practice is to use a space to separate words. The space is allowed inordertomakethetranscriptioneasiertoread but has no phonetic meaning. Stresses are marked in word-level transcriptions as in ...
user6726's user avatar
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2 votes

Is there a term for words differing in stress (only)?

The general term for two distinct words differing exclusively in terms of a single property is "minimal pair". There is no special technical term for "differing only in stress" (or ...
user6726's user avatar
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2 votes

Do some languages use lexical stress to differentiate words with unrelated meanings?

Though not lexical stress, Japanese uses different pitch accent patterns to differentiate words: sàké 'alcohol, sake' sáꜜkè 'salmon' It could get more complex when you consider attaching clitics: ...
LAFN1996's user avatar
2 votes

Do some languages use lexical stress to differentiate words with unrelated meanings?

For some truly unrelated words, English has entránce (to put someone into a trance) and éntrance (a way to enter a space). These two have different, and fairly transparent, morphology: en + trance, ...
Draconis's user avatar
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2 votes

History and Reason of Portuguese accentuation marks

The accentuation system in the orthography of Portuguese was created to be logic, so that every word shows where the stressed syllable is in the most economic way, making only a relatively small ...
Ergative Man's user avatar
  • 1,436
2 votes

Swahili stress with two vowels in a row, how does it work?

In words that are stressed regularly, the stress will be on the second last orthographic vowel or on a syllabic nasal if it is the second last syllable. (Unless the morpheme is only two syllables, as ...
Imralu's user avatar
  • 135
2 votes

How can we represent a stressed monosyllabic word?

"word stress" is not the relevant kind of stress here. When wiktionary says: a particle showing agreement. In this meaning, 是 is stressed. truly; indeed. ... it almost surely means "...
drammock's user avatar
  • 824
1 vote

Do some languages use lexical stress to differentiate words with unrelated meanings?

German has things like wi’dersprechen “contradict” and wiederspre’chen “speak again”. (Same vowel sounds, but with artificial orthographic distinction.)
fdb's user avatar
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1 vote

What is the phonetic difference between "White House" and "white house"?

The answers given are good. To reply to one of the comments above, the "h" is pronounced in both cases in American English; it is a question of stress that determines the difference. wɑ́jt ...
Laurie Forsman's user avatar

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