5 votes
Accepted

Is there any natural language having minimal pairs over tongue root position?

Insofar as you've put creaky and breathy voice in one bin, and a three-way distinction in "ATR" in a second, you have described a situation that doesn't exist in any known language. There ...
user6726's user avatar
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5 votes
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How are Tone and Intonation languages different acoustically?

There is no dichotomy between tone languages and intonation languages. The available evidence indicates that all languages have intonational systems. Some languages have lexical stress, some have ...
user6726's user avatar
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3 votes

Why do nouns typically have their main stress on the penultimate while verbs on the ultimate (according to theories other than that of Hayes)?

One version of a "why" answer is to study the history of the system: I would recommend looking at this paper and references therein (Danielsson 1948; Dresher & Lahiri 2005; Fikkert, ...
user6726's user avatar
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3 votes

Do all languages use emphasis to communicate importance?

More or less by definition, "emphasis" means "communicating importance". In spoken language there is a common method of signalling importance, via "intonation". Written forms of languages can do the ...
user6726's user avatar
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3 votes

Tone associated to segments other than vowels

"Associating" is a phonological relation, pertaining to the distribution of tones relative to segments. The notion that a segment is capable of having the association relation with a tone is ...
user6726's user avatar
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3 votes
Accepted

What is the origins for the ban on crossing association lines in feature geometry?

Association lines are used for phonological representations, not processes (processes operate on representations). In the simplest kind of case, bábâ has two tiers, baba and HL, with the elements of ...
user6726's user avatar
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3 votes
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What kind of experimental procedures can be used to determine tone values (1-5)?

There is no (implementable) experimental procedure for doing this, and the main reason is that the thing you want to do isn't well-defined (but I'll try to define it sort of, with the goal of making ...
user6726's user avatar
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3 votes

Is it accurate to claim that autosegmental phonology is a theory of suprasegmental prosodic phenomena?

Actually, negating the difference between segmental and suprasegmental is what autosegmental phonology is all about (see Goldsmith 1976 and similar publications of the era). The premise of "...
user6726's user avatar
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3 votes

Understanding Linguistic Categories

It is, more precisely, a key tenet of science that the world is only comprehensible when things are grouped into categories, and categories have orthogonal hierarchical relations to each other. There ...
user6726's user avatar
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3 votes

The affixation differentiating between nominal arithmetic and adjectival arithmetic

I've never seen this kind of vowel alternation analyzed as a "simulfix" like that. I would say that it would be preferable to use either of the following analyses: the different ...
brass tacks's user avatar
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2 votes

Understanding Linguistic Categories

"... where does that leave us with respect to suprasegmental phenomena like tone, word-stress, sentence-stress, etc.?" It leaves us in the same place, so far as I know. Tones may be sequences of ...
Greg Lee's user avatar
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2 votes

Do all languages use emphasis to communicate importance?

More generally, do all languages use what I'm calling "stress" or "emphasis" to underscore points? No, they do not all do that. Some languages prefer to use word-order. For example Swahili, gari ...
Omar and Lorraine's user avatar
1 vote

Evidence for segmental phonology in the acoustic speech signal

The physical properties of the speech signal do not provide evidence for phonological analysis into a system of categories, which might include "segment". If you want evidence for the ...
user6726's user avatar
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1 vote
Accepted

Is vowel harmony prosodic, suprasegmental, or both?

"Prosody" derives from προσῳδία, which you can read all about here: it roughly is about pitch being superimposed on speech. In Latin this was extended to poetic meter. Modern linguistics (in the past ...
user6726's user avatar
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