15

There is no such list, but you could build one. You can find (multiple) frequency lists for many languages, and you could come up with a way to decide which frequency list to use (there are very many for English). I suppose you are thinking you might construct a list with entries like {day, Tag, jour, день, gün, siku, päivi, 日} where all of the words seem ...


11

(This was going to be a comment but it got too long. I hope it is useful nonetheless.) I can speak for Austroasiatic linguistics (a fairly large family with a small core of researchers actively working on reconstruction). The consensus in the field is that glottochronological estimates are outdated and not particularly useful. In current presentations, ...


8

Wikipedia (as another commenter already mentioned): 168 languages or language families. Internet Archive: Rosetta Project: Swadesh Lists: 1234 languages - the most extensive I know of (unless you wish to go and dig through primary literature). Swadesh Lists for some less well-known languages: ca. 290 languages. There seem to be only the raw lists, so if you ...


8

I think you are looking for the "Swadesh list", a list of the 100 most common concepts across languages. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swadesh_list


4

One of the core assumptions of lexicostatistics, the constant word replacement rate, was questioned be Daniel Nettle (1999) who suggests different rates of language evolution depending on the size of the speech community. Language in small (and small means really small here) speech communities changes faster than in larger ones.


3

Since it was not linked in the other answer, IELex database Edit: SIL.org also shares many Swadesh lists, some pdfs, xmls panlex.org Edit 2: 171 languages in gdoc online at kurdishdna.blogspot.com Edit 3: many indigenous American languages ailla.utexas.org. Search for Wordlists. Mostly as mp3 or wav files. @Flying did you ever get round to ...


1

This is becoming too long for a comment ... For pointers towards Swadesh lists see this question and its answers Database of Swadesh lists — unfortunately I don't see a list for Proto-Indogermanic or other reconstructed languages at first sight. You will have to annotate "cognateness" manually in any case, so you probably better go through the ...


1

The CLARIN Virtual Language Observatory (VLO) has indexed a lot of Swadesh lists. Just enter "Swadesh list" in the search slit (or use this bookmarked query) to get (at the moment of the writing) 1339 search hits to many different languages.


1

I'll go out on a limb and say no, there aren't any such studies. You've already asked for a list of Swadesh lists here, so presumably you're going to make that analysis yourself on those. The uselessness of Swadesh Lists There's also the question how much use Swadesh lists would be for that. Swadesh lists are claimed to be a measure of genetic relatedness ...


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