7

I cannot answer this as a linguist. However, being a native Thai speaker, and being someone who educated himself about linguistics much enough to have some idea on stress-timed vs. syllable-timed (acoustic phonetics is one of my particular interests), I believe that I can provide some good information on Thai's prosody (specifically stress and rhythm). To ...


5

The main fact that has to be accounted for is that many languages have phonological processes that distinguish heavy from light syllables, for example in Mongolian, stress is assigned to the first "heavy" syllable; in Arabic (broadly speaking: much dialect divergence and fine-grained specifics differ), stress is within the last 3 syllables and the ...


5

I wouldn't hundred percent subscribe to Tamil (refering here to classical Tamil Sangam poetry) being mora-timed. The counting of morae (from the first grammar Tolkāppiyam onwards) is somewhat confusing. E.g. there is of course one mora allotted to a short syllable and two morae to a long one, but moreover there is half a mora for overshort u and i and even a ...


4

According to Draga Zec in The Cambridge Handbook of Phonology, the older model of onset, rime, nucleus, coda— —was superseded by the mora model— —which can account for everything the notion of 'rime' could, and more. It's mostly language-independent, but there's a distinction in that some languages have weightless C codas (as in (c) above), while in ...


3

I have not seen any writing system that uses such kind of timing notation for everyday language. But in the analysis of poetry, feet are annoted with macrons and breves above the written representation of the language, creating a kind of tabulature. Not every poetry can analysed like this, but the system works well for classical Latin and Greek poetry. ...


3

Shorter answer: as many as any other single consonant. Coda consonants aren't necessarily moraic – in some languages they are, in some they are not. Affricates are usually single consonants with a particular kind of release (not everything written "ts, tʃ" is an affricate, sometimes they are sequences. "Affricates" are single sounds, not sequences of sounds)....


3

Short answer: one (probably). Longer answer: The definition of "morae" tends to depend on the specifics of the language and your analysis. They're not something we can necessarily measure quantitatively—instead, they're theoretical constructs used to make an analysis look nicer. (Sometimes morae do map cleanly to measurable units of time, other times they ...


3

Look at Japanese (when written in kana instead of kanji) for a good example. Japanese is a mora-timed language, which means each syllable contains a certain number of morae ("beats"), and every mora is pronounced for approximately the same length of time. When writing in kana, each character represents one and only one mora, whether that's a CV syllable (カナ ...


1

There are many written languages that cleary distinguish between long and short vowels or consonants. One example is Finnish, where long vowels and long consonants are indicated by doubling the relevant letter. Another example is Arabic (in its fully vocalised form).


1

Here are some definitions and discussion of relevant terms that hopefully might help clarify some of the linguistic concepts. I'm sorry for the excessive length, which I'll try to trim down as I organize these thoughts better. Pretty much all of the terms you've brought up refer to phonemic concepts, or theoretical elements of the organization of a language'...


1

The idea that language timing can be stress, syllable or mora is highly simplified, and it is actually false if taken to refer to phonetic facts about syllable length in actual speech. In real life, even in so-called "syllable-timed" or "mora-timed" languages, syllables or morae are often realized with measurably different lengths; and in so-called "stress ...


1

There is a phonetic concept of "timing" that relates to more or less constant units of duration in milliseconds, so that if a language is "syllable-timed" then you find more consistency of duration according to the number of syllables, but in a "stress-timed" language, stress units (e.g. the stressed syllable and the unstressed syllable after it) will be ...


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