6

I would guess each of these words has a different history and therefore the reason for the existence of antonyms is not unique. For example, sanction comes from a Latin root that meant "to decree, confirm, ratify, make sacred" (related to sanctum "saint, sacred"); that's the original meaning, while according to the source Seemingly contradictory meaning "...


5

Every language is chock full of synonyms—hundreds or thousands of them. Usually, those synonyms have some difference. They might: … have slightly different connotations (usually "baby" includes toddlers, but "infant" doesn't), … be usable in different sets of constructions (compare "eat" and "consume"—only the latter requires an object), … be in different ...


4

Taurus is a proper name with little synchronic connection to cattle apart from usage of Latin in English for biological nomenclature and astrology, but bovine is an adjective which plainly means "related to cattle". Latin taurus probably derives from Greek ταῦρος, and is taken unmodified from Latin into English, whereas bovine is a fully nativized English ...


4

In Sanskrit there are dozens and dozens of synonyms for 'sun', none of them a loanword. The same goes about other notions, too, generally speaking Sanskrit has very few loanwords, mostly names of plants and animals. A dozen words for 'spoon'. Could you, please, definitely show some cultural exchange that stood behind the unimaginable number of synonyms in ...


3

Well, those are among the first candidates to be called absolute synonyms if we do accept the existence of absolute synonyms, but there are always arguments for the opposite idea. For example, autumn looks a bit different in different places, and that referents of autumn and fall may differ between speakers. Both taxi and cab are cars carrying people for ...


3

Copyright isn't relevant to this. If any law is involved it will be trademark law. But some genericised trademarks are no longer enforceable. Specific answers for your examples are: snapable bricks (perhaps. I'm not certain if there is a common generic name for Lego-like toys) photocopier. In Australia we never say anything other than photocopier. searched ...


3

As pointed out by others, "true synonyms" do not exist. At least not when taking pragmatics into account. If we ignore pragmatics for a moment, we could claim that, e.g., At most five people will come to the party and Less than six people will come to the party are (truth-conditionally) equivalent. In any case, even this example is not uncontroversial. ...


3

If you're looking for a list of such words, then be aware that Stack Exchange sites aren't the correct forum for discussing list questions. Regarding the (limited) linguistic significance of these words, it's worth noting that there are actually two types of "universal" words. The first are words that are often (but not always) similar even in languages ...


3

It's not an idea that would be taken seriously. First, such a list wouldn't be based on a particularly large sample of languages, so the "universality" of the word would be mere speculation. Second, it doesn't reveal anything significant about language, it only tells you that the bikini was a recent invention and that languages are generally quite willing to ...


3

My best guess is that the final syllable is from the Khmer word for to walk. It makes sense based on how the Khmer word for stairs is spelled. At least I cannot find any other good explanation as I do not know where the Thai syllable ได should come from besides Khmer. ដើរ /daə/ to walk, to go, to move, to operate; to be working, to be operating (e.g. ...


2

There’s no reason to assume this is a borrowed word, although Tai languages have borrowed some words with this shape (minor syllable – major syllable, or “sesquisyllabic”) from Khmer and Mon. Marvin Brown in “From Ancient Thai to Modern Dialects” includes several words with the กระ- minor syllable on his list of common Tai etymons, such as กระดูก /kradu:k/ “...


2

I think the word you are looking for is plesionym. See, for example, ftp://ftp.cdf.toronto.edu/pub/gh/Hirst-NearSynonyms-95.pdf.


2

After a little bit of testing I've noticed a couple things. The most complex words seem not to be labeled as common. The number of words making up a synonym increase as complexity increases The word length increases as complexity increases. So it looks like its a weighted combination of those 3 factors. You'd have to try it out against a set of words and ...


1

Attempts to rigorously define "word" as distinct from other word-like combinations of morphemes have not been successful in the field. So the short answer is, there's no way to tell; the slightly longer answer is that it depends on your criteria for calling something a word. Or, since you ask about word forms, what is the difference between "two words" and "...


1

These are precisely what I was looking for: https://tiny.tw/ https://apps.techglimpse.com/tweetshort/


1

You have two input choices: 1. analyze dictionaries (wordnet, worknik or wiktionary), 2. use word embeddings (word2vec, glove, elmo). Use this data with a WSD (word sense disambiguation) solution. Search github for WSD. Also, this is worth looking at: https://blog.openai.com/discovering-types-for-entity-disambiguation/


1

What you call a word is actually called a lexeme, what you call inflected forms are actually called lemmas. The difference between the lexeme-to-lexeme synonymity and the lemma-to-lemma synonymity is actually the point of your question, but I am afraid your question cannot be answered, for the former and the latter are phenomena of different levels, it is ...


1

The word you are looking for is "lemma", also called "headword".


1

Synonymy is a spectrum Two words can be regarded as synonymous just due to a relation in meaning. Though usually, words referred to as "synonyms" are those who mean the same thing. Thing is, semantics isn't just definitions. There's another side to it. Connotations. This is were objectivity starts to fade and you see many different opinions based on race, ...


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