3

It's traditional in phonetics to give a ᴠᴏɪᴄᴇ, ᴘʟᴀᴄᴇ ᴍᴀɴɴᴇʀ (VPM) label in the description of consonants. This kind of label corresponds to the entry that such a consonant would have according to the International Phonetic Association IPA chart. So you can think of the VPM label as a kind of name for that type of consonant. Any further phonetic detail, for ...


3

If you’re using what I understand to be the ‘classic’ rhetorical terms, I think this is litotes: using a negative statement (‘not tall’) to convey an understated positive one (‘short’). This term is included on this Wikipedia page with many others: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_rhetorical_terms (As an aside, I want to note the structure of your ...


2

With respect to the 2nd aspect you said you were looking for: "2. an aspect that has a meaning of 'eventual or definitive' ex: he has gone eventually." I'm not certain if this is what you have in mind, but ASL has a grammatical aspect inflection I haven't seen mentioned in the literature which may be similar in meaning to the type of aspect you ...


2

I don't understand what you're saying about those examples, but it looks like you're talking about compositional meaning versus non-compositional meaning. To take a really obvious example, the meaning of the word "cats" is trivially deducible (a compositional function) from the meaning of the parts "cat" and "-s", and the ...


1

I am aware of the terms transparent (for a predictable meaning) and opaque (for a word form unrelated to the meaning). There is some continuum in the notion of transparency/opaqueness allowing for shades of grey between fully transparent and fully opaque.


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