41 votes

Aren't all spoken languages tonal?

Most languages called tonal are more precisely described as having lexical tone. This means that tone conveys a meaningful distinction between different lexical items. E.g. in Mandarin, 妈 mā with a ...
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13 votes

Aren't all spoken languages tonal?

It has been a long-standing challenge to define the difference between tone and intonation, since both exploit fundamental frequency as a physical exponent. The difference is generally drawn by ...
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2 votes

Aren't all spoken languages tonal?

All languages have intonation (at sentence or phrase level), or the rise and fall in speech over an utterance but not all languages are called tonal. Let's take Chinese (which I don't know at all). ...
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1 vote

Is there a name for

All sections of text delimited by final punctuation are sentences. Merriam-Webster's definition of a sentence is "a word, clause, or phrase or a group of clauses or phrases forming a syntactic ...
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1 vote

what's this linguistic phenomenon?

If anything, such usage is called "topicalization". Like in "The house, it is big", "The boss, he is rich". I think, English grammar requires a comma here. One can ...
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