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The term is acronym or word acronym. In a narrow sense, an acronym is differentiated from an initialism, which is pronounced letter by letter. Merriam-Webster's Dictionary of English Usage (1994: 21): A number of commentators (as Copperud 1970, Janis 1984, Howard 1984) believe that acronyms can be differentiated from other abbreviations in being ...


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The term "morphophonemic" derives from an earlier theory of language, taxonomic structuralism, which focused on defining various levels of linguistic analysis with a strict separation between the levels. Each level of analysis had its own vocabulary (in the sense of "things that it operates on"). The first level of "analysis" is ...


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I don't think that book is using semantic unit in a technical sense. I think he is talking about the way that Chinese characters (in particular) are often popularly supposed to represent some sort of abstract "idea" or "semantic unit". Contemporary linguists generally regard them as representing morphemes of the language, not abstract ...


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No, it is not correct that way. First of all, a lemma form is not necessarily infinitive: For Latin verbs, the 1st person singular present tense is chosen by convention as the lemma form, for nouns it is usually the nominative singular. Second, there are a lot of words that don't inflect at all, think of prepositions (or postpositions), conjunctions, or ...


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I think for English speakers it's more intuitive to start with allomorphy than with allophony, so here's my stab at it. In English, the regular plural suffix is realized as either /z/, /s/, or /ɪz/ depending on the last sound of the word stem it attaches to, as in dogs /dɒɡz/, cats /kæts/, and dishes /dɪʃɪz/. To native English speakers, this is nearly ...


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Here's an example which might help. Consider the sound(s) spelled with the letter T in the following words: toe, stow, pity, hit. Are they the same sound? On the physical, concrete level, they clearly aren't. The t in toe is pronounced with aspiration -- a puff of air -- which is mostly absent in stow. The t in pity sounds like neither of those, but is ...


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This is an example of inflection. When verbs are inflected, that is called conjugation, but there are also non-verb inflection, such as adding the letter "s" to indicate plural nouns, or changing "he" to "him" to indicate that the pronoun is objective.


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There's no terminology that generically describes all such differences, but the most likely kind of difference, what I suppose you have in mind, relates to the idea of a "verb form" – under that heading you would include for instance "saw", "seeing", "seen". In English, verbs can have a number of forms depending on ...


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It is "subject", because you're set up the question with a syntactic criterion, not a semantic one, and that syntactic frame (for English) identifies "subject". If you want a name for a semantic property, you have to describe it in in terms of semantic properties. What real-world events are you trying to name? You might start by ...


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In traditional grammar a finite form of a verb is a fully specified verb form according to all verbal categories relevant to the specific language, like voice, aspect, mood, tense, person, or number. Non-finite verb forms are underspecified in this respect, leaving out some of the categories required for a finite verb form (typically tense, person and number)...


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• Are the two featured categorizations correct? They do look correct, from my point of view. Unfortunately, you haven't mentioned whose exactly point of view you would like your categorizations to be judged from. Let's hope somebody else here can guess that. • Why aren't class-changing affixes regarded as inflectional affixes? Here I will speak about the ...


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