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3

It's traditional in phonetics to give a ᴠᴏɪᴄᴇ, ᴘʟᴀᴄᴇ ᴍᴀɴɴᴇʀ (VPM) label in the description of consonants. This kind of label corresponds to the entry that such a consonant would have according to the International Phonetic Association IPA chart. So you can think of the VPM label as a kind of name for that type of consonant. Any further phonetic detail, for ...


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To some extent is is a specific feature of English and other languages you tried. It is not a completely general rule, but it is quite common. Also, many languages are not named after countries, but after nations that do not always have their country or got their country only relatively late (often in the 20th century). Of course, in basically all languages, ...


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Grammars such as The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (Huddleston & Pullum 2002) refer to such sentences as it-clefts. Note that John runs does not have the same meaning as It is John who runs, and that the two examples may not even have the same truth values in the same contexts. The second is not a pleonasm.


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No, I won't call it a passive voice. I'd describe it as a figure of speech, namely some kind of pleonasm using more words than strictly necessary to transport the information.


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If you’re using what I understand to be the ‘classic’ rhetorical terms, I think this is litotes: using a negative statement (‘not tall’) to convey an understated positive one (‘short’). This term is included on this Wikipedia page with many others: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_rhetorical_terms (As an aside, I want to note the structure of your ...


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I don't understand what you're saying about those examples, but it looks like you're talking about compositional meaning versus non-compositional meaning. To take a really obvious example, the meaning of the word "cats" is trivially deducible (a compositional function) from the meaning of the parts "cat" and "-s", and the ...


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I am aware of the terms transparent (for a predictable meaning) and opaque (for a word form unrelated to the meaning). There is some continuum in the notion of transparency/opaqueness allowing for shades of grey between fully transparent and fully opaque.


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With respect to the 2nd aspect you said you were looking for: "2. an aspect that has a meaning of 'eventual or definitive' ex: he has gone eventually." I'm not certain if this is what you have in mind, but ASL has a grammatical aspect inflection I haven't seen mentioned in the literature which may be similar in meaning to the type of aspect you ...


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Fisherman vs. fishmonger The fisherman is so named because he engages in the act (verb) of fishing - Subjective genitive. The subject of 'fishing' generates the title. The fishmonger is one who sells fish (noun) - Objective genitive. The object 'fish' generates the title.


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