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They are called fillers in linguistics.


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The question that exists in phonological theory regarding syllables, moras and so forth is, what is the required collection of suprasegmental units required to describe human language phonological grammars. Practically speaking, this means, "do we need all of the set {skeletal position, mora, onset, rhyme, nucleus, coda, margin, syllable}?" The ...


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@chepner Also, this case is possible to describe as 'self-reference word': https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Self-reference


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At the risk of not actually answering your questions, I suggest autological (or sometimes autologous or homological) - something that describes itself and 'autological' is an example of its own meaning, it does describe itself. As there are other words like 'short' or 'multisyllabic' that also describe themselves, 'autological' seems to be a word that ...


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There is no curent consensus about the distinction between a language and a dialect, and their exact definition varies depending on the time and authors. Like Max Weinreich said, a language is a dialect with an army and navy. I think however that the definitions of Pidgin, Creole and Lingua Franca you gave are more consensual and pretty much commonly ...


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Ok, in this case, I think that creole, pidgin and lingua franca might not be at first a language (think about a complete and independente system of signs), but they can turn into a new language at some point, like Haitian Creole for example: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haitian_Creole. But it is certainly a more complex question to answer then what I did ...


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I think the term framing is perfectly cromulent to the situation described in the question.


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Here was a communication gap between @Janus Bahs Jacquet and @Пилум, so to fulfill the gap, you can read those items that close to 'semantic associative convergence': https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paronymic_attraction https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phono-semantic_matching https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Regularization_(linguistics) Good luck!


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This phenomenon is called 'doublets', or 'etymological twins'. Look up more here: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doublet_(linguistics)


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