14 votes

Is there a name for the type of word that the word, “scarecrow,” is? (a transitive verb conjoined with its object)

This is a specific subtype of exocentric compound. An exocentric compound is one which doesn't inherit the type of either of its constituents: a scarecrow is neither a type of crow nor a type of ...
  • 10.5k
8 votes

Is there a name for the type of word that the word, “scarecrow,” is? (a transitive verb conjoined with its object)

There are actually several of these words in English: "rattlesnake", "crybaby", "scatterbrain", "killjoy", "tattletale", "tumbleweed", etc. ...
  • 53.9k
8 votes
Accepted

What is the intuition behind the term Transitive for verbs?

The grammatical sense of the word "transitive" comes from the Latin transitivus, which as you imply the idea of going (itus) across (trans). This is calqued from Hellenistic Greek μεταβατικός. The ...
  • 5,553
6 votes

Is There A Limit To Valency/Transitivity?

Of course, whether a nominal is a complement or an adjunct of the verb makes a big difference as to whether it should be counted in valency. The artificial logical languages Loglan and Lojban permit ...
5 votes
Accepted

Is There A Limit To Valency/Transitivity?

The verb bet has a valency of four. The roles are The bet maker The other person The stake of the bet The situation bet about We call these the arguments of the verb. While most arguments are ...
  • 5,444
3 votes

How to find which verbs are semantically-related to a given verb or noun?

For verbs, FrameNet might be what you're looking for. If you search for "show" there, you'll find several entries for different frames, including lexical entries and annotated sentences. In this case,...
  • 61
3 votes

What percentage of verbs in English take both a direct and an indirect object?

As John Lawler notes in his comment, the big problem is defining the class of verbs you mean. Typically, we use "give" as an example of a verb that can have both an indirect and direct ...
  • 70k
2 votes

What percentage of verbs in English take both a direct and an indirect object?

I am not a linguist by trade, so I don't know if I should even attempt to answer this, but here it goes because curiosity is killing this cat. In an attempt to answer my own question, I simply took ...
  • 313
2 votes

Is there a name for the type of word that the word, “scarecrow,” is? (a transitive verb conjoined with its object)

A comment to Anu Garg's A-Word-A-Day suggested that these might be known as 'tosspot' words, which has become a recurring theme on AWAD. The term is slowly spreading to blogs, but I don't know if it's ...
  • 128
2 votes

Transitive nouns (and adjectives) evidences from early Indo-Aryan languages

Begin with "The sloppy eating of fish is disgusting", with the noun "eating", and replace the PP "of fish" with the direct object NP "fish", thus creating a transitive construction. Notice that "...
  • 12.2k
2 votes

Intransitive verbs that take Indirect objects

Serbian has something like that, if I am understanding you right. Some Serbian intransitive sentences can still have dative, genitive and/or locative arguments; an example for this would be она му[D] ...
  • 1,387
1 vote

Intransitive verbs that take Indirect objects

Latin uti "to use" takes an ablative complement: aratro utor "I am using a plow".
  • 1,347

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