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42 votes
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Are Hungarian and Turkish related?

Turkish and Hungarian are typologically similar: They are both agglutinating languages with vowel harmony and rather rich vowel inventories. They are, to our best knowledge, not genetically related. ...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
12 votes

Are Hungarian and Turkish related?

Hungarian belongs to the Ugric subgroup of the Uralic language family, while Turkish belongs to the controversial Altaic language family. Nevertheless, Hungarian has had some kind of contact with ...
Midas's user avatar
  • 2,552
10 votes

If I learn Persian/Farsi, could I be able to understand Uighur language?

No. Your friend is right about Uighur being Turkic. But Persian is not Turkic; it's Indo-European, so lexical similarity between these languages is going to be VERY low and limited to a few loan-...
Omar and Lorraine's user avatar
10 votes
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What are "Auxilliary nouns" in Kyrgyz?

As far as I'm aware, "auxiliary noun" is essentially a synonym for "relational noun" (see Wikipedia). These are basically nouns that can be used to fulfil the role of adpositions, ...
Miztli's user avatar
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8 votes

What language was spoken in East Asia before Proto-Turkic?

As for the title question, the answer would be "many languages, including proto-Chinese". Focusing on the question in the body, the language spoken by the historical ancestors of proto-Turks, there ...
user6726's user avatar
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6 votes

Accuracy of automatic (machine) translation of two languages in same language family

Update: Much has changed since 2019. I added updates at the bottom. You're right to suspect that the accuracy can potentially be very good, but, in practice, unfortunately, as of 2019, most of the ...
Adam Bittlingmayer's user avatar
6 votes

How "üçün" is Turkic but "çün" is Iranic?

Turkic üçün is a postposition meaning “because of, on account of”. It is undeniably Turkic; see Clauson, Etym. dictionary of pre-13th-century Turkish, p. 28 seq. Persian čūn is a conjunction meaning “...
fdb's user avatar
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6 votes

Why did auxiliary verbs in Kazakh got completely merged into one word in Turkish?

I don't think that Turkish -yor is the result of merging jatir to the verb. Turkish language belongs to Oghuz branch which has significant differences from Kipchak branch. Constructs similar to ...
Tuňuquq's user avatar
  • 257
6 votes
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Japanese is in its own lingustic family, but it sure seems to have a lot in common with Turkish

Japanese and Turkish are structurally similar, if you compare them to English, Spanish, Vietnamese or Arabic. They are somewhat more like Arabic, but I am guessing that you don't speak Arabic so you ...
user6726's user avatar
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5 votes
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Turkic etymology dictionary

Words are not cited as Persian or Avestan loans just because they are attested in texts. Iranic languages have loans as well. If an Iranic word (e.g. birādar 'brother' > Turkish biradar) is without ...
Midas's user avatar
  • 2,552
5 votes

Turkish "Yaz" vs. Azerbaijani "Yaz"

I am not sure that there is any good explanation. Clauson’s Etymological dictionary writes that “there is utter confusion in the Turkish languages about the words for 'spring' and 'summer'”. Perhaps ...
fdb's user avatar
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5 votes
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What were the pre-Arabic Turkic words used for greeting?

The examples you gave are indeed Turkish, but they are not greeting words. Instead they are questions basically "How are you". You can say that in Turkish "Nasılsınız?". The root Esen is used for ...
kabraxis's user avatar
  • 492
5 votes

Why did auxiliary verbs in Kazakh got completely merged into one word in Turkish?

The why? question is not answerable from a linguistic point of view, it just happened so. But there is a general phenomenon across languages named grammaticalization that describes the fate of words ...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
5 votes

Did Turkic languages have a different 'r' sound that couldn't be pronounced unless conected to a vowel from behind?

These are really two separate questions, one about initial r-, one about syllable-final -r jumping across syllables. Prosthesis With regard to the prosthesis of initial r-, I believe you are correct. ...
Adam Bittlingmayer's user avatar
4 votes

Etymology of the Turkish word for copper (bakır)

The root is not known. But for etymology I would recommend Misalli Büyük Türkçe Sözlük (It is online on kubbealtilugati.com . According to it, bakır has been used since the old Turkic, but there are ...
kabraxis's user avatar
  • 492
4 votes

The reason for similarity of Turkic "min" and latin "mille", Turkic "dil" and dutch "taal"?

There are three reasons that words in different languages may sound similar: Common origin; Loans; and Coincidence. Common origin gives us series of related words. For instance, English "father" and ...
Luís Henrique's user avatar
4 votes
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Can it be that the etymology of the Balkan root for "tickle" stretches as far as Korean?

I think I have an answer, based on the comments under the question. The answer is basically "no". The Romanian and Bulgarian form is common, and is of Slavic origin, and has to be ...
cipricus's user avatar
  • 696
3 votes

Turkic etymology dictionary

I would suggest Misalli Büyük Türkçe Sözlük prepared by İlhan Ayverdi. You can find the online version http://lugatim.com/
kabraxis's user avatar
  • 492
3 votes

Are Hungarian and Turkish related?

Hungarian and Turkish are not proven yet to be related, and likely aren't. Hungarian is Finno-Ugric like Finnish, Estonian, Khanty, Mansi, Udmurt, Komi, Sami etc., though with very distinctive ...
mi1000's user avatar
  • 51
3 votes

Is the the Turkish word kin 'hate, venom etc' restricted to Anatolian-Turkish only?

I totally agree with fdb. Although I cannot say if it is used in Central Asian Turkic Languages( Turkmen, Uzbek and Uighur), for certain I can say that (not sure about today but) it existed in ...
kabraxis's user avatar
  • 492
3 votes
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Is the the Turkish word kin 'hate, venom etc' restricted to Anatolian-Turkish only?

I cannot answer the first part of your question, but as far as etymology goes it is very straight-forward: it is from Persian kīn “hatred” (from Middle Persian kēn, Avestan kaēna- “revenge”).
fdb's user avatar
  • 24.2k
3 votes

What were the pre-Arabic Turkic words used for greeting?

I think the (modern) Uyghur word is cognate with Old Turkish yakış, Turkey-Turkish yahşı “good, pretty”.
fdb's user avatar
  • 24.2k
3 votes

The reason for similarity of Turkic "min" and latin "mille", Turkic "dil" and dutch "taal"?

No relation. Bin or min is Bıng (not with a i but ı) in the old Turkic. Dil is Tıl (not with a i but ı) in the old Turkic. And its real meaning is tongue not language.
kabraxis's user avatar
  • 492
3 votes
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Etymology of the Turkish word for copper (bakır)

There is no evidence that bakır comes from any other living language family, and cognates of it are present in many other Turkic languages. Yakut uses the Turkic root for gold, many major Turkic ...
Adam Bittlingmayer's user avatar
3 votes

Can it be that the etymology of the Balkan root for "tickle" stretches as far as Korean?

In Korean, 간지럼 ganjireom is the noun referring to a sensation of feeling 'ticklish' but also 'itchy'; the verbal adjective / descriptive verb 간지럽다 ganjireopda is its basic lemma form. The related verb ...
Michaelyus's user avatar
  • 7,466
2 votes

What is this language?

This is Armenian. I'm failing to translate whole text, though it's not a dialect, on the contrary, it seems to me to be a literary language, quite standard, it's just that I'm failing to understand 10%...
shabunc's user avatar
  • 919
2 votes

Does anyone knows a work on Mongolian loanwords in Turkic languages?

I recommend ESKİ VE ORTA TÜRKÇEDE MOĞOLCA KELİMELER by Tuncer Gülensoy. Not only does it have a good summary, it also includes lots of sources for that topic. I also recommend this paper: ...
kabraxis's user avatar
  • 492
2 votes

Does anyone knows a work on Mongolian loanwords in Turkic languages?

The standard work on Turkish etymology is Clauson's "Etymological dictionary of pre-thirteenth-century Turkish".
fdb's user avatar
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2 votes
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Configurational assignment of accusative case?

Some X' theories have a layer above V that they call v ("little-v," because it was originally conceived for dealing with voice and valency), and claim that accusative case (and the agent) get case ...
matan-matika's user avatar
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