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40 votes

Are the longest German and Turkish words really single words?

From the perspective of linguistics, the question is meaningless though well-intentioned. "Word" is not a well-defined technical concept in linguistics (or, some people may have concocted a ...
  • 71.7k
37 votes
Accepted

Are Hungarian and Turkish related?

Turkish and Hungarian are typologically similar: They are both agglutinating languages with vowel harmony and rather rich vowel inventories. They are, to our best knowledge, not genetically related. ...
21 votes
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Reversal of kinship terms when speaking to a child

Is there a name for this phenomenon? There are several in fact, but there doesn't seem to be a single unified term, which is quite a problem because it makes looking it up a real pain in the neck. ...
18 votes

Is Turkish older than Bulgarian?

Rather than a direct answer, let me explain why it makes little sense to ask such a question. Current languages didn't appear at a distinct moment in time,[1] but rather it evolved gradually from an ...
  • 341
15 votes

In Turkish, regarding the locative, how do we know which suffix (-de or -da) should be used?

Turkish has a rule of vowel harmony: it depends on the vowel of the preceding syllable. You get [a] after u ı o a and [e] after ü i ö e. There are some complications about final consonants in loan ...
  • 71.7k
14 votes

Are the longest German and Turkish words really single words?

In German, noun phrases that are used to describe a separate entity other than their individual nouns are written without spaces. Thus, the example of Kraftfahrzeug-Haftpflichtversicherung may indeed ...
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13 votes
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Etymology of the Turkish word "rüzgâr"

The semantic shift seems to be: time > weather > wind For the first step compare Latin tempus “time” > French temps (“time, weather”). For the second compare German Wetter (“weather”) with ...
  • 22.8k
12 votes

Are Hungarian and Turkish related?

Hungarian belongs to the Ugric subgroup of the Uralic language family, while Turkish belongs to the controversial Altaic language family. Nevertheless, Hungarian has had some kind of contact with ...
  • 2,534
10 votes
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Turkish kalem: from Anc. Greek or Tocharian?

The Greek word kalamos “reed, reed pen, stylus” has a good Indo-European etymology (cognate with, for example, German Halm “reed”). It was borrowed not only in Arabic, as qalam, but also into Sanskrit ...
  • 22.8k
8 votes

Adjectives in Turkish always comes before the noun?

Turkish is a typical head-final language which means that nouns, which are the heads of noun phrases (NP) and verbs which are the heads of verb phrases (VP) always come at the end of those phrases. ...
  • 16.6k
7 votes

Reversal of kinship terms when speaking to a child

I wondered about this and answered my own question on the German StackExchange. The phenomenon exists in German dialects, but not Standard German (with the possible exception of Pate; see below). I ...
7 votes

Adjectives in Turkish always comes before the noun?

the house is nice is a sentence. Its equivalant is Ev güzeldir which is a sentence too. For convinience people say ev güzel. On the other hand güzel ev is not a complete sentence. Bu güzel evdir is a ...
  • 482
7 votes

List of minimal pairs in Turkish

There doesn't appear to be such a list, hence I made you one based on this word list: i o aç iç öç uç üç ad od öd af of öf uf ağ eğ iğ ah eh ıh oh ak ek ok al el il ol öl an en in on ön un ün ...
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6 votes
Accepted

Turkish: the -DIK participles and an information loss

Your observation is correct and you're not missing anything. The original case information is simply lost with -DIK (and -(y)EcEK) participles. So is most of the original tense information by the way: ...
  • 2,165
6 votes
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Is there a "maximal coda principle"?

The quoted sentence from the Wikipedia article isn't very clear, and I wouldn't be confident that the author knew what they were talking about. Syllables and syllabification rules are very ...
6 votes

How "üçün" is Turkic but "çün" is Iranic?

Turkic üçün is a postposition meaning “because of, on account of”. It is undeniably Turkic; see Clauson, Etym. dictionary of pre-13th-century Turkish, p. 28 seq. Persian čūn is a conjunction meaning “...
  • 22.8k
5 votes
Accepted

Plural form declension with numbers in Turkish

In Turkish, a plural declension is not needed if the noun is modified by a numeral. (If it is used, it is emphatic.) In fact, it is not needed with any modifier that already implies plural. arkadaş (...
5 votes

Reversal of kinship terms when speaking to a child

"to my knowledge, it doesn't exist in English or French for example" Actually, my father, born in a Francoprovençal village, often called me "mon petit père" or "mon gros père" (I used to be a chubby ...
5 votes
Accepted

Turkic etymology dictionary

Words are not cited as Persian or Avestan loans just because they are attested in texts. Iranic languages have loans as well. If an Iranic word (e.g. birādar 'brother' > Turkish biradar) is without ...
  • 2,534
4 votes

The reason for similarity of Turkic "min" and latin "mille", Turkic "dil" and dutch "taal"?

There are three reasons that words in different languages may sound similar: Common origin; Loans; and Coincidence. Common origin gives us series of related words. For instance, English "father" and ...
4 votes

most common Turkish words

A Frequency Dictionary of Turkish by Yeşim Aksan, Mustafa Aksan, Ümit Mersinli and Umut Ufuk Demirhan (Routledge, 2017) contains the 5,000 most common words in Turkish, based on a 50 million word ...
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4 votes
Accepted

why is erdogan pronounced erdowan?

According to Zimmer & Orgun (1999, p. 155), the letter <ğ> has different pronunciation acording to its environment: Word-finally and preconsonantally, it lengthens the preceding vowel. Between ...
  • 16.6k
4 votes

Turkish "Yaz" vs. Azerbaijani "Yaz"

I am not sure that there is any good explanation. Clauson’s Etymological dictionary writes that “there is utter confusion in the Turkish languages about the words for 'spring' and 'summer'”. Perhaps ...
  • 22.8k
4 votes

Can causative and anticausative co-occur in Turkish verbal morphology?

Definitely, it's especially common for certain verbs. Bir ev tahliye ettirildi Translation: A house was evacuated In Istanbul, following the past earthquake many houses cracked (sic.)...
4 votes
Accepted

Why does Latin, Turkish, and Albanian share common words?

There are three possible explanations: Turkish has borrowed many words from other languages, just as has Albanian. I have been told courant d'air is actually a Turkish word (probably spelled the ...
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3 votes

Is "Qadaqan" Mongolian or Turkish?

The modern Persian word pronounced /γadaγan/ means “prohibition” and the like; it is spelt both as غدغن and as قدغن. It can hardly be a native Persian word. I have searched for it in Clauson’s “...
  • 22.8k
3 votes

The reason for similarity of Turkic "min" and latin "mille", Turkic "dil" and dutch "taal"?

No relation. Bin or min is Bıng (not with a i but ı) in the old Turkic. Dil is Tıl (not with a i but ı) in the old Turkic. And its real meaning is tongue not language.
  • 482
3 votes

Etymology of the Turkish word for copper (bakır)

The root is not known. But for etymology I would recommend Misalli Büyük Türkçe Sözlük (It is online on kubbealtilugati.com . According to it, bakır has been used since the old Turkic, but there are ...
  • 482
3 votes
Accepted

Etymology of the Turkish word for copper (bakır)

There is no evidence that bakır comes from any other living language family, and cognates of it are present in many other Turkic languages. Yakut uses the Turkic root for gold, many major Turkic ...

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