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42 votes
Accepted

Are Hungarian and Turkish related?

Turkish and Hungarian are typologically similar: They are both agglutinating languages with vowel harmony and rather rich vowel inventories. They are, to our best knowledge, not genetically related. ...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
12 votes

Are Hungarian and Turkish related?

Hungarian belongs to the Ugric subgroup of the Uralic language family, while Turkish belongs to the controversial Altaic language family. Nevertheless, Hungarian has had some kind of contact with ...
Midas's user avatar
  • 2,562
7 votes

Proto-Uralic *kämä vs Akkadian kamūnu

... is said to derive from ... This is folk etymology. In a case like this, where it's a similar sounding word in many unrelated languages across a region, you should be especially skeptical. The ...
Adam Bittlingmayer's user avatar
6 votes

How did Asian and European people end up speaking Uralic languages?

If you distinguish Finno-Ugric from Uralic, Samoyedic isn't Finno-Ugric, and is often considered a sister of Finno-Ugric. In referring to the Nenets as being Asian people, it's not clear if you're ...
user6726's user avatar
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4 votes
Accepted

How does the Hungarian accusative case suffix -t come from Proto-Uralic partitive case suffix?

Well the simple answer to this is that it cannot be true since Proto-Uralic did not have a partitive case. The partitive case in Finnic languages originated from the Proto-Uralic ablative case, and ...
Someone211's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

Proto-Uralic *kämä vs Akkadian kamūnu

Just to add a bit to Adam's excellent answer: "Cumin" is what's called a Wanderwort or wander-word: it's a word associated with some sort of trade good, which spreads from language to ...
Draconis's user avatar
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3 votes

What is the origin of certain Hungarian suffixes?

I looked up these in Zaicz Gábor's "Etimológiai szótár - Magyar szavak és toldalékok eredete" (Etymological dictionary - The origin of Hungarian words and suffixes). Accusative -t: ...
maritsm's user avatar
  • 163
3 votes

Could Proto-Indo-Uralic be reconstructed?

Nope We have only two proto-languages to compare, and the list of attested roots is already sparse. The set of potential cognates is even sparser and leaves not enough material for reconstruction. It ...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
3 votes

Are Hungarian and Turkish related?

Hungarian and Turkish are not proven yet to be related, and likely aren't. Hungarian is Finno-Ugric like Finnish, Estonian, Khanty, Mansi, Udmurt, Komi, Sami etc., though with very distinctive ...
mi1000's user avatar
  • 51
3 votes
Accepted

How it is that Proto-Finno-Ugric had the word meaning 100 (a borrowing from Indo-Iranian), but not the word for 10?

Your premise about necessary relations for number terms is in error. There is no word in English for 987, but there is a word for 1000. The number "100" is not a "basic word", nor ...
user6726's user avatar
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2 votes

Earlier stages of definite/indefinite conjugations in Hungarian

However, the indefinite conjugation is used when the direct object is a first or second person pronoun. As a native speaker (not a linguist) I disagree that we should call this "indefinite ...
Szabolcs's user avatar
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2 votes
Accepted

Is the multiplicative case 'validly' present in any languages?

Some languages (e.g. Georgian) have adverbial case which turns adjectives and nouns into adverbs, and it's a 'real' case. However, as far as I know, it's not used in the multiplicative meaning. ...
Yellow Sky's user avatar
  • 18.5k
2 votes

How do proponents of Indo-Uralic explain the major differences between the consonant systems of pIE and pUralic?

Have you read this article by Kortlandt? http://www.kortlandt.nl/publications/art213e.pdf In it he explains how he understands the development of I-E stops from Indo-Uralic stops on the basis of ...
Ned's user avatar
  • 606
2 votes

Could Proto-Indo-Uralic be reconstructed?

Yes, but only to certain limits. While its completely obvious that there is no evidence or only very small evidence that Proto-Indo-Uralic actually existed, there are some attempts to reconstruct it. ...
Rock's user avatar
  • 465
2 votes

Could Proto-Indo-Uralic be reconstructed?

No. The general consensus among linguists is that there's no compelling evidence for any sort of "Indo-Uralic" language family. Basically, the null hypothesis is that there's no genetic ...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 66.7k
1 vote

From which language was the Finnish word for "language" derived?

The "Altaic" languages are generally not considered a valid group, not to speak of Ural-Altaic, so the words you mention do not go back to one original source, but rather to two separate sources, one ...
pinnerup's user avatar
  • 1,013

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