3

Russian is such a language, although this feature is not followed by speakers as consistently as, for example, in Spanish. The majority of the Russian qualitative adjectives have two forms, short and full, the short one being the oldest, Proto-Slavic had only short adjectives, and the full adjectives were formed from the short ones, by adding article-like ...


3

Some presuppositions of the question need to be exposed, mainly regarding the term "allophonic". The historical distinction between "allophonic" vs. "morphophonemic" has fallen into desuetude, to the point that it is rare to find any contemporary mention of "allophony" that accepts the idea that being allophonic (as opposed to something else) is an important ...


3

To me, perhaps to some other phonologists, this question is uninterpretable, since it mixes fact and theory. Allophones are the realizations of phonemes and have acoustic properties. Phonemes are part of our theories about observable acoustic properties. Phonemes don't have acoustic properties, only allophones do. Consequently, any sort of acoustic ...


3

For a general introduction to the ways that Greek dialect and style interact over time, Geoffrey Horrock's Greek: a History of the Language and its Speakers will have the best overall coverage. A lighter (though still fairly technical) approach is in Leonard Palmer's The Greek Language. There's also a website for an advanced course in Greek Rhetoric and ...


2

Diglossia typically refers to the situation you've described when the two forms are named, 'recognized' varieties. The distinction is a culturally reified one, while changing register is not usually considered to be a clear shift from e.g., 'Work English' to 'Street English'.


2

I will first point out that SE is designed for people to ask specific questions that get specific answers which are either right or wrong. It is not designed to people to vaguely invite to chat and give opinions. Given that, I assume that you are asking how the idea of "arbitrariness of the sign" plays out in the domain of language change. The idea relates ...


1

The number of words is less important than the number of mi and shi present in your text. First, you should determine how many mi and shi exist in each of your corpus. It is not necessary to differentiate for each text (1a, 2a, ...). What it is relevant is the number found in each of your kind of narrative texts. Then, the number mi and shi should be ...


1

A lot of things have to be clarified in your question. First, you need to say what the theoretical population of fundamental frequencies is – do you mean "in all instances of speech" (excluding musical and other non-speech uses of phonation)? You also need to specify age range, since infant speech has kind of high F0. You need to specify language: pitch ...


1

Synonymy is a spectrum Two words can be regarded as synonymous just due to a relation in meaning. Though usually, words referred to as "synonyms" are those who mean the same thing. Thing is, semantics isn't just definitions. There's another side to it. Connotations. This is were objectivity starts to fade and you see many different opinions based on race, ...


1

I hope I understood you question correctly. I think Chinese gets the closest to the language you're talking about. I am not familiar with aspectual coercion term but I would not say that Chinese does not allow it. There are sentences in Chinese where Tense in not expressed in either morphological or syntactical way but inferred from the context. 他_He 说完_to ...


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